ACT News

Company claims it can deliver a 'perfect' rain free wedding day ... with a price tag

A British company is promising it can stop rain ruining couples' wedding days by offering a £100,000 ($A194,000) cloud-bursting service.

The UK's Daily Telegraph reports that while they may be able to meticulously plan every aspect of the big day, one thing that couples famously cannot control is the weather.

Now those wishing to ensure everything is perfect can hire a team of "cloud bursters", arranged exclusively by luxury travel company Oliver's Travels.

It claims they will ensure "the only cloud at your wedding will be Cloud Nine".

Staffed by a team of highly-specialised meteorologists and pilots, the "Perfect Day" team will fly a light aircraft above the clouds, sprinkling them with silver particles, causing the clouds to burst and vanish before the big day.

The technique was used in the 2008 Beijing Olympics, by Paul McCartney at one of his gigs in 2003 and at the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge's wedding in 2012, to guarantee flawless weather on that special day.


Oliver Bell, Co-Founder of Oliver's Travels said: "We pride ourselves on our innovative approach, and are thrilled to be able to offer such an unusual, unique service to our customers, to ensure their wedding is the talk of the town."

The firm's website states: "One thing always bugged us - we can help plan everything down to the last detail, but there was one thing we could never really change: The weather.

"So we decided to do something about that.

"We're proud and just a little bit excited to be able to offer an exclusive 'cloud-bursting' service to our customers, 100 per cent guaranteeing fair weather and clear skies for when you tie the knot!"

The Perfect Day Cloud Bursting service starts from £100,000. The service is available when booking selected Oliver's Travels wedding chateaux in France.

Cloud bursting involves using silver iodide to "seed" the clouds - essentially giving the water vapour something to condense around to produce rain before it gets to the wedding venue.

Cloud seeding was developed in the 1940s by US chemist Vincent Schaefer.