Bruce Wharrie and Marg Hayes, of Jindabyne, were about 1.5 kilometres south of Mount Kosciuszko Mr Wharrie fell forward onto his face, breaking his leg.

Bruce Wharrie and Marg Hayes, of Jindabyne, were about 1.5 kilometres south of Mount Kosciuszko Mr Wharrie fell forward onto his face, breaking his leg. Photo: Snowy Hydro Southcare

The Snowy Hydro SouthCare helicopter rescued a man near Mount Kosciuszko on Sunday afternoon after his partner of 23 years skied two kilometres for help.

Bruce Wharrie and Marg Hayes, of Jindabyne, ski every weekend during winter and are ski instructors. The pair were about 1.5 kilometres south of Mount Kosciuszko about 2.30pm and Mr Wharrie was skiing around some turns when he fell forward onto his face, breaking his leg.

Ms Hayes, a teacher, said it was frightening to see him take the tumble. ''I was actually behind him, so I saw it all happen and he sort of screamed out because he was in pain, and I had to get my skis off first before I could help him,'' she said.

Cross country skiing accident involving a male patient in his 50s. The patient and his wife were stranded, she had to ski for 2kms to get reception and call 000. Click for more photos

Snowy Hydro Southcare rescue

Cross country skiing accident involving a male patient in his 50s. The patient and his wife were stranded, she had to ski for 2kms to get reception and call 000. Photo: Snowy Hydro Southcare

  • Cross country skiing accident involving a male patient in his 50s. The patient and his wife were stranded, she had to ski for 2kms to get reception and call 000.
  • Cross country skiing accident, involving a male patient in his 50?s. The patient and his wife were stranded, she had to ski for 2kms to get reception and call 000.
  • Marg Hayes from Jindabyne with Bruce Wharrie who is recovering at Canberra Hospital after breaking his leg while cross country skiing and had to be airlifted by SnowyHydro, Marg had to ski 2km to get mobile reception to call 000.
  • Cross country skiing accident involving a male patient in his 50s. The patient and his wife were stranded, she had to ski for 2kms to get reception and call 000.
  • Cross country skiing accident involving a male patient in his 50s. The patient and his wife were stranded, she had to ski for 2kms to get reception and call 000.
  • Cross country skiing accident involving a male patient in his 50s. The patient and his wife were stranded, she had to ski for 2kms to get reception and call 000.
  • Cross country skiing accident involving a male patient in his 50s. The patient and his wife were stranded, she had to ski for 2kms to get reception and call 000.
  • Cross country skiing accident involving a male patient in his 50s. The patient and his wife were stranded, she had to ski for 2kms to get reception and call 000.
  • Cross country skiing accident involving a male patient in his 50s. The patient and his wife were stranded, she had to ski for 2kms to get reception and call 000.
  • Bruce Wharrie who is recovering at Canberra Hospital after breaking his leg while cross country skiing and had to be airlifted by SnowyHydro. He kept a time log on his hand about the events of the accident.

Ms Hayes, knowing Mr Wharrie would need to be rescued, made him as comfortable as she could then skied for about half an hour to find a high spot, where she found mobile phone reception and called emergency services.

Mr Wharrie, a town planner, used a pen to record on his hand everything that happened between the time of the accident and when he arrived at Canberra Hospital, creating a timeline of the day's events.

''We're both cross-country ski instructors, and we also run cross-country ski tours, and so it's very handy to continually be exposed to and review the time it takes for these rescue operations,'' he said. While he was waiting he also jotted down a reminder to pick up a ticket in today's lottery.

Ms Hayes said they had packed lights, fluoro vests and extra gloves and jumpers in case an emergency meant they had to spend the night on the mountain, and the fluoro vests had helped the helicopter pilot spot them.

''We would have been warm enough if we had to spend the night, but I'm glad they came, that was pretty good,'' she said.

They had ridden their bicycles to Rawsons Pass, and after the helicopter picked up Mr Wharrie, Ms Hayes pushed them eight kilometres in the dark to their car.

Mr Wharrie said he hoped to be out of hospital today after doctors operated on his leg. ''I'm comfortable, the leg is a little painful,'' he said.