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Health plan to put fat, sugar out of easy reach

ACT Chief Health Officer Paul Kelly.

ACT Chief Health Officer Paul Kelly. Photo: Supplied

Fatty foods and sugary drinks would be removed or hidden from easy view in the Canberra Hospital and other ACT Health Directorate buildings, under proposals being considered to improve the diet of staff and visitors.

At least 80 per cent of foods and drinks sold in Health Directorate vending machines, canteens and cafes would have to be "green'' or "amber'' health-rated, under recommendations published in a discussion paper.

"Red'' category items, such as chocolates, soft drink, lollies, cakes, slices and deep-fried food, would no longer be used for fund-raising, rewards, incentives, gifts or giveaways.

The red foods would be removed from eye-level in vending machines.

If the changes are implemented and prove successful in the Health Directorate, they could eventually be rolled out across the ACT Public Service.

ACT Chief Health Officer Paul Kelly said the discussion paper did not propose banning junk food from Health Directorate buildings, but did suggest ways to make it easier for people to choose healthy meals and beverages.

"We're trying to make the healthy choice the easy choice for people,'' Dr Kelly said.

"At the moment for many of the food choices in the hospital there is no healthy choice - or the healthy choice is difficult. So we're proposing to flip that on its head.''

The discussion paper has been the subject of a continuing consultation process with staff and the general public. The discussion has not included the meals served to hospital inpatients and the initiative would not apply to food and drinks brought into Health buildings for personal use.

Dr Kelly said changes being considered included rearranging the composition and placement of items in vending machines.

"Have a green sticker on the healthy items in a vending machine, have them at eye-level, have the less healthy item at the bottom,'' he said.

About 55 per cent of Health Directorate staff who took part in a 2011 survey were found to be overweight or obese.

Dr Kelly said the ACT was lagging behind the Northern Territory and the six states when it came to the food provided to Health Directorate staff and volunteers.

"We've got to get our own act together; it's just a no-brainer that the hospital should get its own act together - and not just the hospital, but the clinics, so we're leading by example.''

Another recommendation being discussed was to ensure that healthy food was provided by outside caterers employed for special events.

"We'd like to start to influence the business models of that kind of catering businesses,'' Dr Kelly said. The discussion paper recommended that "red'' foods still be permitted for major events such as Christmas parties and major fund-raisers.

Dr Kelly said other government agencies might wish to follow the example of the Health Directorate.

"Once we get our act together here, we'd like to see that expanded into the rest of the public service that we have some kind of influence over and through that an even wider reach,'' he said.

25 comments

  • No such thing as choice any more is there.

    Commenter
    J72
    Date and time
    May 06, 2013, 7:39AM
    • To J72,

      Hardly a constructive comment is it?

      Read the article before you whinge.

      'the discussion paper did not propose banning junk food from Health Directorate buildings,'

      Are you whingeing for it's own sake?

      Commenter
      Choice
      Location
      Victoria
      Date and time
      May 06, 2013, 9:10AM
    • There wasn't much in the way of choice to begin with - I've visited hospitals numerous times and struggle to find a meal that isn't freeze-dried overly processed crap. I hardly expect 5 star quality, but it's not that hard to offer a few healthy choices on the cheap.

      Commenter
      Disgruntled Goat
      Date and time
      May 06, 2013, 11:07AM
    • From casual observation of 'health workers' smoking overweight people are prevalent & show a bad attitude

      Commenter
      Curious
      Location
      Melbourne
      Date and time
      May 06, 2013, 2:47PM
  • I am an adult and can make my own choices as to what I will eat. I am sick of these do-gooders trying to impose their views on me. As for fundraising, LMFAO, who in their right mind is going to buy fund raising apples!!!

    Commenter
    Thought Police
    Date and time
    May 06, 2013, 8:16AM
    • Agreed.. no one is going to buy a 'healthy' fund raising treat.

      Commenter
      April
      Location
      Canberra
      Date and time
      May 06, 2013, 9:21AM
    • One of the most successful fundraisers I was involved in was fruit from a farmer known to one of the parents. The farmer got more for the fruit that selling them elsewhere, the families got fantastic fresh apples and pears to last them a couple of weeks.

      Commenter
      bornagirl
      Location
      Melbourne
      Date and time
      May 06, 2013, 1:25PM
  • More worrying is the food dished out to patients in hospitals across the country, these people don't have a choice unless family brings in all their meals. At the very time when healthy, nutritious food is most needed, they are served up meals made from powdered stocks and processed soups etc, designed only with cost per meal in mind.

    Commenter
    Liz
    Date and time
    May 06, 2013, 8:33AM
    • Couldn't agree more

      Commenter
      NM
      Date and time
      May 06, 2013, 9:37AM
    • In the early 90s I worked as an RN a major metropolitan hospital, our ward included those patients having major bowel resections for colon cancer. Times may well have changed and families are now bringing their relatives low-fat, low-salt, low-sugar healthy meals just bursting with vegetables, but in those days the "meals" brought to patients by their relatives were invariably Mc Donald's, KFC, Hungry Jack's and similar. The nursing staff thought it was pretty funny that patients said the hospital food was bad but they were prepared to fill their bodies with this rubbish.

      Commenter
      Cat
      Date and time
      May 06, 2013, 11:59AM

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