A former security guard who planned an inside job club robbery and showed ''a complete lack of remorse'' for his crime has been jailed for 6½ years.

Adam John Street will be eligible for parole in June 2016 after serving at least three years and 10 months of his sentence.

It is the 35-year-old's second significant prison stretch, after serving 12 months of a 2½-year sentence in NSW for conspiracy to commit armed robbery.

In the ACT Supreme Court on Monday morning Justice John Burns said Street was ''intimately involved'' in planning the robbery.

Two other men, Roland Chauveau and Matthew Turner, burst into the Weston Creek Labor Club about closing time on February 27, 2008.

Both men were wearing balaclavas; Turner was armed with a rifle and Chauveau with a baseball bat.

Street, who had known both men for several years, was on shift at the time.

The robbers tied up Street, the bartender and the duty manager before making off with more than $124,000, stealing the duty manager's car to escape.

Street broke his bonds and hit the duress alarm.

He was later charged with aiding and abetting aggravated robbery, and telephone records showed he had phone contact with the robbers in the hours leading up to the heist.

Earlier this year a jury heard Street told the men to come in the back way, that there wouldn't be any patrons around, gave them a sports bag and a .22 rifle, told them to leave via a side door and described the manager's car.

Justice Burns said Street, a former soldier and martial arts expert, played ''a key role in [the robbery's] execution''.

And the judge noted he continued to act like a victim for several months after the heist, including calling the duty manager and offering support.

''What made the whole experience worse for [the victim] was discovering that you were involved, as she leaned on you as a person she could trust,'' he said.

Justice Burns said he was satisfied Street called the victim to extract information about the police investigation - a ''callous use'' of the victim and demonstrating his ''complete lack of remorse''.

Eight months after the Weston Creek job a NSW court jailed Street after he pleaded guilty to conspiring to commit another armed robbery in June 2008.

Canberra police, monitoring phone taps, received ''credible information'' Street and his co-offenders were planning to rob an elderly couple's Queanbeyan home.

They tipped off their NSW counterparts, and police pulled over Street and two other men on Canberra Avenue.

The NSW officers found a shotgun, a pistol, and ammunition in the car.

''Despite pleading guilty to that charge you apparently do not accept your guilt,'' Justice Burns said.

He described Street's assertion - that his co-offenders ''fitted him up'' - as ''arrant nonsense''.

At an earlier sentencing hearing consulting psychiatrist William Knox told Justice Burns he had diagnosed Street with chronic post-traumatic stress disorder in 2007.

But Dr Knox did not believe Street was suffering from the condition at the time of the Weston Creek robbery.

The diagnosis stemmed from a fight outside Cube nightclub in July 2006, when Street was working as a bouncer.

Street's boss, club owner Maurizio Rao, fatally stabbed Nato Seuala in the head and abdomen; Mr Rao and Street were badly injured.

The club owner was later tried for murder and acquitted on the grounds of self-defence.