Musican and recorder specialist, Claire Taylor, 24 of Hawker, warms up with a mug of mulled wine as storm clouds gather over the Belconnen Arts Centre.

Musican and recorder specialist, Claire Taylor, 24 of Hawker, warms up with a mug of mulled wine as storm clouds gather over the Belconnen Arts Centre. Photo: Graham Tidy

Faced with foul weather this weekend, the first instinct may be to hunker down and stay under the covers.

But there are some warming options to entice Canberrans out of their homes as a top temperature of nine degrees is forecast for Saturday and just seven degrees for Sunday.

Mulled wine and music may warm the heart and soul at the mid-winter celebration markets being held at the Belconnen Arts Centre on Saturday from 1pm to 5pm.

The centre's community inclusion officer Philip Piggin said almost 20 stallholders would be offering handmade products from chocolate to wine to artworks and knitwear. There would also be Vietnamese food and musicians including resident choir Shades of Monday.

The Hot Shop at the Canberra Glassworks also sounds like the place to be.

The Canberra Glassworks have glass blowing on every weekend, with the temperature between 30 and 32 degrees on the Hot Shop floor.

Visitors to the glassworks can get close to the heat, guided through the processes to make a paperweight. Sessions run for about 20 minutes on Saturdays and Sundays from 10am to 4pm. Bookings essential and there is a cost.

Bikram Yoga Canberra in Mitchell bills itself as "Canberra's hottest room" . The yoga centre takes participants through 26 postures in a temperature of 38.5 degrees. There are classes on weekends and no bookings are required.

And this weekend may present the bizarre phenomenon that it may actually be warmer within the Phillip Ice Skating Centre, than outside.

That's especially so on Saturday night when the Canberra Knights will take on the Melbourne Ice on Saturday for ice-hockey's Centenary of Canberra match.

Centre manager John Raut said a big crowd was expected with the game starting at 5.30pm but spectators advised to get there by 4.30pm to ensure a seat.

"It's always a minimum of about 12 degrees inside. It could get to 15 degrees with a good crowd," he said.

And there was nothing cold about the atmosphere of an ice hockey game.

"Once you go to a game, you give up going to anything else around," Mr Raut said. "The hecklers club take up one section and they've got the tom toms going, the clackers and everything else and make so much noise."

For those who prefer their ice skating outside, the rink in Garema place will be all things German on Sunday with accordions and lederhosens and German sausages with sauerkraut and non-alcoholic gluhwein.

There will be a series of free "lederhosen on ice skate shows" during the day at 11.30am, 1.30pm and 3.30pm.

Visitors are encouraged to dress in costume and German-themed colours with prizes being awarded on the day for the best dressed.

Afterwards, head to Jo's Juice at the Old Bus Depot Markets in Kingston on Sunday is also known for its comforting hot mulled wine or warming lemon and ginger drink on a cold winter's day.

And spare a thought for the Tjintu Desert Band from Central Australia, who are playing at the sold-out Rock for Reconciliation at the Street Theatre on Saturday night, braving some very wintery conditions down south.

Tjintu Desert Band tour manager Vanessa Hutchins said while temperatures could dip way below zero in the desert, the difference was locals were usually "back in a t-shirt by lunchtime''.

"Hopefully Tjintu Desert Band, which means sun band, can bring a bit of warmth to Rock for Reconciliation this weekend,'' she said.