Jerrabomberra residents, Penny and Jamie Hooper, front, and Matt Zan der Plaat, rear, at the open day for residents on controversial Tralee development.

Penny and Jamie Baker and Matt Zan der Plaat, centre, at the open day. Photo: Melissa Adams

Jerrabomberra resident Penny Baker is not entirely supportive of the NSW government's approval of the controversial Tralee housing development.

But the development of 2000 homes on the NSW border does have one significant advantage for Mrs Baker, her husband Jamie and their daughter Raven, aged 7.

''If there's a high school developed as part of this, that is going to be a very good thing,'' she said. ''We are happy that by the time our daughter is old enough to go to high school, there might be a new high school here.''

Open day for residents on controversial Tralee development.

Open day for residents on controversial Tralee development. Photo: Melissa Adams

Jerrabomberra residents who attended an open day held on Sunday by the developer, Village Building Company, said Tralee's rezoning signalled the end of a long wait for community facilities for the area.

''There's a sports club, swimming pool, playground, high school,'' resident Ray Hooper said after viewing the plans. ''I think it's a good development.''

But Mr Hooper said he believed aircraft noise would worry the suburb's residents.

Canberra Airport opposes the rezoning, adamant that complaints about aircraft noise will stymie development of the hub.

''We used to live in the flight path and there was a bit of noise, but we put up with it,'' Mr Hooper said. ''I noticed a plane come over before and I thought, I wouldn't want to live under that.''

But Jerrabomberra Residents Association vice-president Margot Sachse said noise complaints would come from elsewhere. ''What will come to pass if they start flying 24 hours a day is that the people of Hackett and the people of Gungahlin will be the ones pushing for a curfew,'' she said. ''When they take off and push over towards Gungahlin and they do that at two in the morning, that will be where the complaints come from, not south of the airport.''