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Retired Public Servant Fred Pilcher having a comfortable retirement on his current superannuation.
The Canberra Times
03 April 2013
Photo Jay Cronan

Fred Pilcher is comfortable in his Kaleen backyard but he worries others may face rough times. Photo: Jay Cronan

Retired public servant Fred Pilcher is one Canberran who is pleased he doesn't have to worry about his superannuation being tinkered with.

But the 61-year-old Kaleen man is concerned other retirees might be in for a rougher time if the government messes with their retirement funds.

While it remains uncertain exactly what Labor is going to do in adjusting the rules around superannuation, Mr Pilcher said people close to retiring must be nervous about their nest eggs.

''I retired in January 2012 and the criterion for me was that I had to have the ability to live in frugal comfort for the rest of my days and not worry about where my next meal was coming from,'' he said.

''I put as much money into my super as I possibly could while I was working, well aware that when I reached the age when I could retire that I could spend the rest of my life doing what I love, which is playing music and having fun.

''My retirement has turned out to be comfortable so far, but I would feel awfully sorry for anyone adversely affected by any messing with superannuation savings or a dismantling of the public service schemes.''

Mr Pilcher joined the public service in 1975 and when he retired last year he was employed as a mid-executive for Shared Services in the ACT government.

His retirement fund was the Public Sector Superannuation Scheme (PSS) and he opted to receive a fortnightly pension from it that is indexed half-yearly according to the CPI.

He said there was little adjustment to the salary he was bringing home when employed. His retirement is comfortable enough - he has built a yurt in his backyard to hide away and play his guitar in or jam away with friends.

''My lifestyle is good. I'll never be rich, but I'm comfortable, and isn't that what retirement should be?'' Mr Pilcher said.

''People contribute to their super so as not to be a burden on society when they retire, and the government shouldn't take that lightly.

''And as for the opposition, who knows what the Coalition will do with it? They are pretty much in a policy vacuum.''