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Road rage on record: cyclists get armed

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Rob Diamond, president of the ACT Vets cycling club, uses a bike camera.

Rob Diamond, president of the ACT Vets cycling club, uses a bike camera. Photo: Katherine Griffiths

DRIVERS beware: Big Brother now rides a bicycle.

Canberra cyclists are using $400 cameras to fight back against dodgy driving.

The cameras are mounted on the handlebars or even the rider's helmet and can be used to prove who has caused a collision.

''There's a lot of road rage at the moment between cars and cyclists,'' said Canberra Cycling Club president Jason Parkes. ''Nobody's been killed yet but I'm waiting for it to happen.''

There are about 1000 members of road racing cycle clubs in the ACT, meaning many riders share the roads with vehicles.

Many club members report a small number of car or truck drivers who deliberately drive close to cyclists. One ute was seen driving in front of a group of riders before braking suddenly.

A collision between a car trailer and a cyclist on a Canberra road posted on YouTube seven months ago has received almost 70,000 hits.

The 13-second video, recorded by one cyclist with a camera, captured the moment a car towing a trailer pulled in front of another cyclist, clipping the rider who wobbled into the next lane and nearly came off the bike. The president of the ACT Vets cycling club, Rob Diamond, uses the cameras for a different reason. He takes groups on cycling tours and uses the footage to promote his business. PHILIP THOMSON

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