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Roads closed as rain causes problems

The Morisset St bridge in Queanbeyan is closed as crews cleanup debris from flood-waters.

The Morisset St bridge in Queanbeyan is closed as crews cleanup debris from flood-waters. Photo: Rohan Thomson

Blue skies returned only briefly to Canberra on Wednesday before heavy rain hit the city after dark.
A record-breaking drenching and minor flooding prompted road closures and 36 emergency call-outs across the capital on Tuesday, while Canberra Airport received 70 millimetres  from Monday.
A Bureau of Meteorology minor flood warning was updated on Wednesday after the Molonglo and Queanbeyan rivers both fell below minor flood levels. Both rivers peaked about midnight, with the Molonglo River at Oaks Estate nearing 5.3metres.
Tuggeranong and Googong Dam recorded falls of 90mm and 120mm respectively following steady rain.
The Territory and Municipal Services directorate announced road closures including Coppins Crossing, Angle Crossing, Oaks Estate Bridge, Sunshine Crossing and Point Hut Crossing, while drivers were warned of excess water on Majura Road.
Corin Road was closed between Woods Reserve and the Corin Dam due to a rock slide caused by rain. No cars were damaged by the rocks.
A TAMS spokesman said further road closures may be necessary and he warned motorists to take caution when driving in wet conditions.
The ACT State Emergency Service received 36 calls for help from 2pm on Tuesday, mostly in relation to minor damage.
Meteorologist Sean Carson said it was the wettest 24-hour period Canberra had recorded in about 18months, but rains were expected to dry up over the coming days. “All in all, it’s heading towards improving conditions,” he said. “There will still be some light falls around.”
Showers and possible clouds will linger in the ACT until Sunday.
Thursday will see partly cloudy conditions, with a top temperature of 16 degrees, after an overnight low of 7 degrees.
Friday will see possible showers and a top of 16 degrees, with clouds increasing on Saturday when there will be a top of 19 degrees.

7 comments

  • Climate change or just a change of government?

    Commenter
    Badger
    Location
    Canberra
    Date and time
    September 18, 2013, 8:46AM
    • Possibly both.

      Commenter
      MJM
      Date and time
      September 18, 2013, 4:51PM
  • I think a lot of it is poor maintaining of drainage systems (partly drought, partly cost savings?).

    An inch or so of rain should not preciptate such chaos.

    Commenter
    Outraged of Palmerston
    Date and time
    September 18, 2013, 9:53AM
    • What a load of rubbish. The system is working as it should, hence why the creeks and rivers are up.

      Whilst there may well have been 50-70mm of rain, once that water stops being absorbed by the ground it flows into rivers or the drainage system which in turn flows into the rivers. When combined in a river that 50-70mm which feel over x number of square metres becomes a whole lot more and levels rise.

      Commenter
      Jimmy
      Date and time
      September 18, 2013, 11:51AM
    • Thanks for the geography lesson. So why did the number of road closures not/not occur in the 90s during periods of high rainfall?

      Commenter
      Outraged of Palmerston
      Date and time
      September 18, 2013, 12:42PM
    • You don't get it. The 'floods' are in the creeks and rivers, that means the drainage systems are working and water is getting to where it should be.

      As for your question I have lived in Canberra since the late 70's and the roads that closed this week are the same roads that have always closed when we get a fair amount of rain. They are all LOW level crossing of waterways. So not sure exactly what your on about.

      The only odd one is Majura road, where of course there is no drainage system anyway (again rebuffing your claim of poor maintenance), but I suspect the construction out that way is probably diverting the water from the way it has always flowed.

      Commenter
      Jimmy
      Location
      CBR
      Date and time
      September 18, 2013, 6:24PM
  • It's simple really, more roofs, more concrete, more roads, all being impermeable, less open areas with a capacity to absorb a percentage of the rainfall and you have conditions conducive to overpower our stormwater system.

    Commenter
    Mungoman
    Location
    Southern Tablelands
    Date and time
    September 18, 2013, 12:12PM
    Comments are now closed
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