An entrant in the sand castle competition. Click for more photos

Broulee sand castle competition

An entrant in the sand castle competition. Photo: Jay Cronan

  • An entrant in the sand castle competition.
  • An entrant in the sand castle competition.
  • An entrant in the sand castle competition.
  • An entrant in the sand castle competition.
  • An entrant in the sand castle competition.
  • Thousands of people flocked to the beach for the sand castle competition.
  • Thousands of people flocked to the beach for the sand castle competition.
  • An entrant in the sand castle competition.
  • Thousands of people flocked to the beach for the sand castle competition.
  • An entrant in the sand castle competition.
  • An entrant in the sand castle competition.

Summer would not be the same without a sandcastle.

But the town of Broulee invited holidaymakers to think bigger and better than the average beach fortress at its annual sandcastle competition this week. Although building sandcastles is usually considered a children's pastime, the contest attracted 72 entries and about 350 competitors in a range of ages in two categories.

More than 1000 spectators inspected the creations that included a dolphin, giant octopus, mermaids, a Mercedes and campsite with a sleeping camper.

It cost $5 to enter and the competition raised $365 for the Broulee and Mossy Point Community Association.

Rules stipulated the sculptures had to be completed in an hour, and only beach tools such as plastic buckets and spades were to be used.

Association president Marie Zuvich said the event was taken seriously with a number of entrants practising their designs before the competition.

The winner - a turtle choking on a plastic bag as an anti-litter message - received a family pass to Mogo Zoo. Minor prizes included surfing lessons and Offshore Surf shop vouchers.

Ms Zuvich said the money raised, to be matched by Eurbodalla Shire Council, would go towards extending the villages footpath network.

The arrangement had already resulted in footpaths from the retirement village. Ms Zuvich said the network of concrete paths was of critical social importance.

"We don't have a village centre in Broulee so our paths are our community hub," Ms Zuvich said. "We're trying to build a community as well as pathways in Broulee.

"A lot of networking, connecting and business gets done on our paths."

Ms Zuvich said the community association hoped Sunday's "Art on the Path" event was as successful.