Assistant Director of Paediatrics at The Canberra Hospital, Katie McKenzie, reads her favourite books on her iPad.

Assistant Director of Paediatrics at The Canberra Hospital, Katie McKenzie, reads her favourite books on her iPad. Photo: Graham Tidy

WITH two children and a demanding job as the assistant director of paediatrics at The Canberra Hospital, Katie McKenzie finds that relaxing with a book maintains her sanity.

But when she's curled up with a good book for an hour before bed it looks a little different nowadays.

Ms McKenzie buys and reads 75 per cent of her novels as ebooks and downloads them on to her iPad.

Paperchain Bookstore Manuka senior staff member Rose Ward restocks some of the Christmas best sellers.

Paperchain Bookstore Manuka senior staff member Rose Ward restocks some of the Christmas best sellers. Photo: Jeffrey Chan

''It took me a while to get used to it from going and choosing a book on the basis of its cover,'' Ms McKenzie said.

But convenience won out.

''Being able to finish a book and then get straight on the net and download another one is great. And it's light and fits in my bag. I don't think it will be too long before I read all my books on the iPad,'' she said.

The 36-year-old attributes her love of reading to her mother and goes through two novels a week at this time of year. At the moment she's reading two. Thriller Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn and Flight Behavior by Barbara Kingsolver.

Ms McKenzie describes her taste in literature as eclectic.

''I read anything.''

But fashion magazines are her guilty pleasure and with an iPad always at her side flipping through Vogue often translates to shopping online.

Ms McKenzie is also trying to pass on her love of reading to her nine-year-old daughter.

''We are reading The Faraway Tree by Enid Blyton.''

And she is looking to share her all-time favourite novels as a child, the Anne of Green Gables series by L.M. Montgomery, with her soon.

''My mum's got them packed away waiting.''

And even though a majority of her reading material is now electronic, she said it was important to keep some traditions alive.''I can see a time when I'll be doing all my reading on the iPad.''