Swans: They got the cup and their man.

Swans: They got the cup and their man. Photo: Getty Images

SYDNEY will get its man but it has also raised the ire of rival clubs that have called for the ''archaic'' salary cap concession for the Sydney clubs to be scrapped.

Tippett pay gripes claims 'offensive' - Swans. Click here.

Hawthorn president Andrew Newbold and Adelaide counterpart Rob Chapman both voiced their frustration at the concession they believe had helped enable the reigning premier afford to entice Kurt Tippett from Adelaide and away from Queensland.

Illustration: Matt Golding

Illustration: Matt Golding

Newbold called on the AFL to review the 9.8 per cent concession (an additional $862,000) in the salary cap that Sydney and Greater Western Sydney received to offset higher costs of living there.

Newbold said the league should review the Swans' contracts to ascertain if the cost of living concession was spread evenly across all players' contracts or was being hoarded to allow them to bid for a big-name player like Tippett.

''I think it is just an outdated policy and one that we as a league should have reviewed a long time ago,'' he said.

''I don't know that Melbourne and even Perth costs are that much lower than Sydney now. I think it is an archaic policy setting that needs to be reviewed.

''Don't get me wrong, I think Sydney are an extremely well-run and organised business, and I am sure they have managed their cap very well.

''They have a very even list of players, but I think this proposed trade has highlighted something that should have been looked at.

''When the reigning premier can go out and have the money to get a player like Tippett when they have that extra money in their cap, I think it is something we need to look at.

''We are not crying over spilt milk [about losing the grand final], we are not saying you cannot do this deal, but what this deal does is show up an anomaly that should have been looked at before.

''I will speak with other presidents, but I think it is something the AFL needs to review and I think it is reasonable for the AFL to look at contracts and say, 'Has the concession been spread across players or hoarded to find money for a player like this?' ''

Adelaide president Chapman reportedly had similar concerns to Newbold.

AFL chief executive Andrew Demetriou was not available for comment yesterday.

The Tippett deal will need to be brokered between the Swans and Adelaide today, but due to ''an understanding'' with Adelaide when he signed his last contract, that deal should be completed for a second-round draft pick and or a third-round pick or player.

The trade period officially opens today when all clubs will meet at Etihad Stadium. The father-son bidding will also be done and it appears Melbourne will need to use its first pick - third overall - if it wants to secure Jack Viney as a father-son recruit, with the Gold Coast almost certain to bid for the highly talented inside midfielder with its first pick.

The loss by the Suns of Josh Caddy may have in part helped persuade them to bid for Viney as a replacement for the tough inside midfielder.

Clubs are also expecting Brisbane or Port Adelaide to bid for Joe Daniher, forcing the Bombers to use their first-round pick - number 10 - on the tall key-position player and son of former player Anthony. It is uncertain if any club intends to bid for Bulldog father-son nominee Lachie Hunter.

If Melbourne is forced to use its first pick on Viney, it is likely to scupper plans for the ambitious deal to trade pick four to Collingwood for Chris Dawes and Sharrod Wellingham.

Melbourne has indicated it would prefer to keep one live early pick in the draft.

That deal already looked unlikely to come to fruition after Wellingham nominated West Coast as the club he wanted to move to and flew out of the country, leaving the negotiations to his manager.