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Eastlake farewells 'unique' Dorman

Date

David Polkinghorne

Dean Roulstone will have a massive honour tomorrow – leading Eastlake out against Belconnen on to Manuka Oval with Brendan Dorman’s No.32 on his back.

Eastlake's Dean Roulstone will honour Brendan Dorman.

Eastlake's Dean Roulstone will honour Brendan Dorman. Photo: Gary Schafer

Dean Roulstone will have a massive honour tomorrow – leading Eastlake out against Belconnen on to Manuka Oval with Brendan Dorman’s No.32 on his back.
Roulstone now wears  the number of the Demons’ late chairman of football, who died from a liver failure on Thursday night ending an 18-month battle, aged 54.
After an unsuccessful liver transplant last week, he came home to Canberra and spent his final days at Clare Holland House.
Last year Eastlake held a  fundraiser to help Dorman battle his illness, with hundreds of people coming along to help him out – including NSW Sate of Origin coach Ricky Stuart.
It will be a big game for the Dees as they look to honour Dorman for his countless years of service to the club. They dearly want to win ahead of his funeral at St Christopher’s Cathedral - across the road from Manuka Oval – and the following wake at the footy club.
Dorman grew up in Narrabundah and went to St Edmund’s College before he started playing for the Manuka Football Club. He was  instrumental in the 1991 merger between Manuka and Eastlake and coached the last  game played by a Manuka side – the 1990 reserves grand final, which they lost to Queanbeyan. He coached the  reserves in the combine’s first season.
Dorman had many jobs – chef, garbage man, builder, cheesecake maker – and took  many different roles at his beloved footy club.
Chris Maher, a long-time friend who became acting chairman of football when Dorman became too sick, said the death had left a huge hole at the club.
‘‘He’s just a unique character, always making people laugh. And always just making a contribution, whether it be footy or whatever else, he worked his backside off all his life as well. He just knew a lot of people and a terrific guy,’’ Maher said.
‘‘...He’d take the piss out of you, Dormo, but you laughed as well. You laughed along with it, he was that sort of bloke.’’

Dorman is survived by his wife Christine and four children – Sarah, Mark, Jess and Nicole.

 

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