A global survey has ranked ANZ and Commonwealth Bank's brand value ahead of that of household names like Shell and Twitter.

A global survey has ranked ANZ and Commonwealth Bank's brand value ahead of that of household names like Shell and Twitter. Photo: Louie Douvis

The brands of two of Australia's big banks are more valuable than those of oil giant Shell or household tech names Twitter, eBay and Linkedin, according to a global market research agency.

Commonwealth Bank and ANZ made Millward Brown's Top 100 Brandz report for 2014, ranked 44 and 51 respectively.

The pair, two of four Australian companies on the list, also beat international brands Gillette (52), FedEx (58), Swedish fashion retailer H&M (63) and Gucci (60).

Senior business consultant at Millward Brown Australia Johnny Panagiotidis said Commonwealth Bank had moved up four places on 2013, with an 18 per cent rise in brand value to $US21 billion ($22.76 billion) this year.

Westpac also made the list with an impressive 17 per cent rise in brand value to $US12 billion, which pushed it up three places to No. 85.

''The impressive growth in brand value of the two Australian brands in this year's Top 100 is in line with the strong recovery in valuations seen across the globe," Mr Panagiotidis said.

ANZ's ranking was unchanged, despite its brand value jumping 15 per cent to $US19 billion.

Overall, the brand value of companies has bounced back strongly since the financial crisis, Mr Panagiotidis said.

The combined value of the top 100 has nearly doubled since the first ranking was produced in 2006 to $US2.9 trillion.

This is an increase of 49 per cent compared with the 2008 valuation, which marked the start of the banking and currency crisis.

''The global financial crisis was a challenging time for many companies but despite fluctuating macro-economic conditions and the impact of digital disruption, we still see seventy-one of the brands listed in our 2014 Top 100 that were there in 2008,'' Mr Panagiotidis said.

''Strong brands are better able to weather the storm and, when valued by companies, create value for them."

Dominant supermarket group Woolworths was also on the list, after falling two places to No.82.

US search engine Google topple rival technology behemoth Apple, which spent the past three year's as the world's most valuable brand.

Google's brand value shot up 40 per cent in a year to $US158.84 billion, Millward Brown said, thanks to its internet-linked eyewear Google Glass.

The company has joined hands with Luxottica, which owns Ray-Ban and other high-end brands, to sell the new product in the United States.

"Google has been hugely innovative in the last year with Google Glass, investments in artificial intelligence and a multitude of partnerships that see its Android operating system becoming embedded in other goods such as cars,'' said Nick Cooper, Managing Director of Millward Brown Optimor.

''All of this activity sends a very strong signal to consumers about what Google is about and it has coincided with a slowdown at Apple."

Technology companies continued to dominate the list, with IBM and Microsoft rounding out the top four.

Millward Brown said the sector, which accounted for 29 per cent of the list, also included many of the list's fastest climbers. Leading Chinese internet brand Tencent scored the biggest increase, leaping 97 per cent to $US54 billion ($A58.53 billion), catapulting it to No. 14.

This was followed by Facebook, which rose 68 per cent to $US36 billion to take No. 21 spot.

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