Myer and David jones shopper pictures at Bourke st Mall.

Just seven days ago, Myer trumpeted that it had snared Andrew Flanagan. Photo: Wayne Taylor

If what the department store is saying about him is true, Andrew Flanagan has more front than Myer.

Myer sacked Mr Flanagan on Tuesday, his first day in the job, after allegations that his CV did not stand up to scrutiny.

Just seven days ago, Myer trumpeted that it had snared Mr Flanagan, a former managing director and vice-president of Inditex Group, the Spanish owner of global fast fashion juggernaut Zara.

The job - group general manager of strategy and business development - put Mr Flanagan just two links down the executive food chain from Myer's long-serving chief executive, Bernie Brookes - and potentially in line for the top job when Mr Brookes finally leaves Australia's biggest department store.

However, on Tuesday Zara contacted BusinessDay, saying Myer's new executive ''was not part and has never been employed by the company''.

''He has not held the position of managing director and vice president for Asia Pacific,'' Zara said.

Myer had also touted Mr Flanagan as having served as chief operating officer of British supermarket chain Tesco's Chinese arm - a claim Business Day was unable to verify.

Alleged stints in procurement roles at US discounter Walmart and Chinese retailer Homeworld Group could also not be confirmed.

Mr Flanagan, who does not appear to have a LinkedIn account, could not be located.

It is believed Myer is considering legal action against Mr Flanagan, or even calling in the police.

In addition, it is investigating how Mr Flanagan managed to win his way through an exhaustive and thorough background check by reputable executive hiring company Quest Personnel and get the job, which reports to Myer chief financial officer Mark Ashby.

Mr Flanagan apparently came equipped with excellent credentials and contacts within the global retail industry.

It is believed that as part of the executive search process Myer was provided with a transcript, running to four or five pages, of an interview conducted by the recruitment company with a person purporting to be a senior executive at Inditex.

Myer was also provided with another transcript, of about the same length, with a purported Tesco executive. In both cases it was represented that Mr Flanagan directly reported to the interviewee.

Another, smaller retailer is believed to have offered Mr Flanagan a job about the same time as the Myer offer. It is believed the head of that company spoke directly to a person who claimed to be a senior executive at Inditex.