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Where the most charitable Australians live

When it comes to giving, Melburnians living in Middle Park rank as the most charitable, followed by South Australians living in Vale Park, residents living in Killara, NSW, and Vaucluse in Sydney’s Eastern suburbs.

The figures, released by NAB in its inaugural NAB Charitable Giving Index, were compiled using donations made by credit card, BPay and EFTPOS. They give Australians – and the 600,000 non profit entities trying to raise money - an idea of who is giving what, when, and where.

The data show that charitable giving in the first seven months of 2012 increased by 4.7 per cent over the same period last year and the average annual donation size increased 0.7 per cent to $292.

Where the money is going

The figures also shine a spotlight on where the money is going. Figures reveal that medical research and services, cancer and health and disability charities attract the most dollars.

In the year to July 2012, around 32 per cent of donations were directed to humanitarian services, which includes Oxfam and World Vision, slightly down from 34 per cent in the previous corresponding period.

The second biggest recipients were community service and children/family charities with 15 per cent of donations, down 1 per cent on last year.

While these get the lion’s share of donations, some other charities increased their market share to 14 per cent, from 13 per cent in January-July 2011. The share of donations to medical research services and health was 12 per cent and health and disability at 11 per cent were unchanged.

Cancer charities received 8 per cent of donations.  Animals and the environment had the smallest share with 7 per cent.

In a media release today, NAB revealed that by postcode, the average amount of money spent on charity per person was highest in Middle Park, Victoria ($334), followed by Vale Park, SA ($276) and Killara, NSW ($248).

Percentage of income given

But if generosity is measured in terms of how much of their income people give then residents from Lakes Entrance, Victoria, win hands down. The index shows that Lakes Entrance gave 0.34 per cent of their income to charity, followed by Vale Park (SA) with 0.31 per cent and Middle Park (Vic) at 0.28 per cent.

It found that on average, the top 10 postcodes from ACT (0.21 per cent) donated most income to charity, while Queensland (0.16 per cent), NSW (0.14 per cent) and WA (0.13 per cent) donated the least.

Paula Benson, NAB General Manager Corporate Responsibility said the index shows a clear uplift in giving in June due to the availability of tax concessions, and again in November, reflecting the success of campaigns such as Movember and a stronger motivation to donate ahead of the Christmas season.

56 comments

  • Middle Park! send the charity muggers there then!

    Commenter
    Big Mac
    Date and time
    October 23, 2012, 1:15PM
    • yes do that itotallyagree with you.

      Commenter
      gospeltruth
      Location
      WOG WOG
      Date and time
      October 23, 2012, 3:21PM
    • Slim pickings across Queensland.

      Western Australia must be completely out of metal money.

      Commenter
      J. Fraser
      Location
      Queensland
      Date and time
      October 23, 2012, 4:45PM
  • Lucky the government does some giving through spending some of our taxes, because as a percentage of income that seems pretty lousy.

    Compare the % of income used on entertainment and leisure with the % of income used for charitable purposes.

    I need to another look at my own balance sheet.

    Commenter
    Barney
    Location
    Sydney
    Date and time
    October 23, 2012, 1:23PM
    • SOME??? Roughly 40% of every tax dollar goes to welfare, which is in itself a form of charity. Before the welfare state became the norm in the West, the function of welfare was typically performed by the churches and traditional charities. So church has been replaced by state.

      And that's not to mention the tax-free status given to all the charity organisations.

      We gave a substantial sum to the Qld flood relief, only to be slugged a further 1.5% of gross income by the Federal Govt.

      I think Labor especially just sees it's role in government as promulgating a giant charity.

      Commenter
      Alx
      Date and time
      October 23, 2012, 2:28PM
    • Considering the AUD has made the average Australian some of the richest people in the world, I think giving less than a third of ONE percent of your income on charity as pretty ordinary, regardless of how tax ends up being spent.

      Stupid Labor vs Liberal arguments don't really get into it.

      Both sides have bloated the public service to huge levels and supported the same safety net, which if you lose your job, are unable to work, beome very sick or lose your retirement savings at least ensures a warm meal in your stomach each day and usually a roof over your head.

      Life is pretty good in Australia eh.

      Commenter
      Barney
      Location
      Sydney
      Date and time
      October 23, 2012, 2:43PM
    • Alx,
      You must vehemently support Labor's cutting of Howard's middle-class welfare then, huh?

      Non-means-tested welfare in the form of the Baby Bonus and First Home Owner's Grant - both products of Liberal policy. Reality is confusing.

      Commenter
      Pablo
      Location
      Sydney
      Date and time
      October 23, 2012, 3:50PM
  • I don't claim my donations in my tax return. To do so negates the good karma of giving.

    Commenter
    Macca
    Date and time
    October 23, 2012, 1:39PM
    • Can't agree with that. Government contributions (via tax deductions) in addition to your donations at least mean there's a contribution (albeit unwillingly) from everybody. If you're worried about 'diluting' your donation, add your marginal tax rate to the figure so you still end up giving the same net amount.

      Commenter
      bornagirl
      Location
      Melbourne
      Date and time
      October 23, 2012, 1:58PM
    • Why don't you just claim your donations and donate your tax return? If you would rather the government have your money than a worthy charity, I think you need to look at why you donate.

      Commenter
      Commenter2095
      Date and time
      October 23, 2012, 2:16PM

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