LETTERS

Some local councils in Sydney estimate that they will lose up to 60 per cent of tree cover on private land as a result of the new vegetation clearing act.

Some local councils in Sydney estimate that they will lose up to 60 per cent of tree cover on private land as a result of the new vegetation clearing act.

The NSW Rural Fires (Vegetation Clearing) Amendment Act, 2014, which came into effect on August 1, is a crude and inefficient means to promote bushfire safety ("Fire up the chainsaw", August 24). Bio-diversity will suffer. Some local councils in Sydney estimate that they will lose up to 60 per cent of tree cover on private land with disastrous consequences for birds, bats, bees, lizards, possums and echidnas.

Under pressure from the State Government, local councils are agreeing to ever smaller lots incapable of sustaining significant trees. Each further subdivision will contribute to the overall loss of trees. Urban amenity will be markedly reduced and the character of our landscape will be lost forever.

Bushland areas will no longer be safe from pre-emptive clearing under this law. Also, the human impacts will be cumulative as there will be less and less protection against the rapidly increasing urban heat island effect as our big cities are being forced to accept high density rapid growth and climate change ramps up over the coming decades.

It is another kneejerk reaction from the anti-environment NSW Government.

Jennie Minifie East Ryde 

Op at the top

The op-shop at which I am a volunteer worker does occasionally get some well-heeled types frequenting our premises, so if Prime Minister Tony Abbott's wife Margie is in the Waterloo area anytime soon she would most welcome ("The first port of call: PM's wife spruiks love of op shops", August 24).

Our Salvation Army Neighbourhood Centre also has a cafe at which Mrs Abbott could partake of items such as a big breakfast or bangers, mash and peas on its very inexpensive menu. So let us see if the Prime Minister's wife will be so charitable by doing her op-shopping south of the Sydney Harbour Bridge.

Eric Palm Canada Bay 

Clive's Show

After reading Annabel Crabb's take on the Cliveosaurus, what with his own airforce, a potential newspaper et al, all he needs now is his own radio and TV network, beaming pirate signals across the globe, including a breakfast show called "The Clive and Jacqui L Show" ("Why Palmer is a hostile foreign power",  August 24). The voters of Fairfax have a lot to answer for.

Allan Gibson Cherrybrook

Moving extract

Thank you for the poignant heartfelt extract "Ghosts of the past still linger" by Kim Williams (August 24). It was difficult to read through my tears but at the same time very inspirational and moving.

Rhoda Silber Manly 

Write on

What's wrong with a few passionate slogans, Don Carter (Letters, August 24)? They didn't do any harm to Coca Cola, Big Macs or Palmolive.

Rosemary O'Brien Georges Hall

Refugee status

It seems the only thing now standing in the way of 1000 refugees being shipped off to Cambodia is that country's insistence none of them should be sent there by force ("Cambodia island in the mix for 1000 refugees", August 24). 

How ironic that of the two parties involved in this shameful arrangement the one raising a moral and ethical sticking point is a government regularly accused of ignoring human rights. But as we have already seen in its shameful refugee policies, Australia long ago lost any claim it may have had to the moral high ground.

Garth Clarke North Sydney

Make it legal

Why not make drugs legal and to be used under strict medical supervision. This would make it a level playing field ("Flanagan not out of the woods yet", August 24). We see players being given pain killing injections so they can return to the field of play, but why is this different to peptides? We will never rid drugs from sport so why not legalise them?

Robert Pallister Punchbowl