South Korean singer Psy (right) performing his hit single Gangnam Style.

South Korean singer Psy (right) performing his hit single Gangnam Style. Photo: AFP

There was a different kind of horsey magic at Randwick Racecourse on Saturday as South Korean superstar Psy performed his dance hit Gangnam Style to tens of thousands of fans.

If the streets of Sydney appeared to be missing a few Gen Y faces it was because most of them had turned up to experience the K-pop phenomenon in person.

But the Future Music festival, which attracted 50,000 fans, had a line-up that veered from Psy to alt-indie rockers The Stone Roses, who first emerged on the British scene in the late 1980s.

Psy's appearance on the Future Music Festival bill caused plenty of hilarity among revellers and some raised eyebrows as his infamous horsey dance, seen in more than one billion Youtube views, was performed live.

In perhaps a nod to the hot, dusty conditions Psy opted for a sleeveless version of his signature suit.

Alashana Stead, 19, who attended the event with her best friends Stephanie Lea and Jenny Thompson, both 19, said it was amusing there was only one Psy song that everybody knew.

But the dancing was priceless.

"It should be on Funniest Home Videos, everyone looks like idiots," Stead said.

Many fans seemed keen to simply see Psy in the flesh.

"It's exciting to see him live, we've only seen him on YouTube otherwise," said Anushka Chainani, 20, from Castle Hill. "Everyone's doing the moves and it's fun - everyone's into it."

Despite being set inside a construction zone, with a waiting time for some punters of more than an hour and a half to even get inside the gates, the mood of the crowd remained upbeat in the March sunshine. Some questioned the slightly shambolic nature of the festival. "I've never seen queues like this in my life, it's so unorganised," said Stephanie Cadwell, 24, from Bondi. But most seemed content just soaking in the atmosphere and outfits noon- denim shorts and crazy animal hats were almost de rigeur.

Some people amusingly questioned the use of the phrase "future music" for bands who had clearly found fame decades ago, including The Stone Roses and The Prodigy, despite both acts being strong drawcards for many fans at the event.

There were plenty of other hot industry names on the bill included Rita Ora, Australian band The Temper Trap and Avicii.

The Future Music festival was just one part of Sydney's mega-music weekend with artists ranging from Kiss and Motley Crue to Paul Kelly and Neil Finn (not to mention Neil Young, Nick Cave and Ronan Keating) also playing gigs over the weekend.