The SC-3 planter.

The SC-3 planter.

JUMP THE SHARK

''You're gonna need a bigger boat,'' Roy Scheider famously ad libbed upon seeing the star of Jaws. As the theme for this year's Fringe Furniture competition it was meant only as inspiration. ''The last thing I wanted was surfboards with a bite taken out,'' said creative producer Neil Harvey. So while the winning entry of the Market Ready category, the SC-3 Planter, resembles the prow of a blood-soaked boat, it's for those with small balconies. ''It's designed for my generation who love plants but can't afford a house and have to keep moving,'' says designer Craig Frankland of the Found Collective. The piece is inspired by futurism, modernist reductivism and origami, he says. Its triangular shapes carry the requisite sense of futurist movement and echo the travel its intended owners will endure. Weight is kept to a minimum with the three pointed leg design. The powder-coated stainless-steel planter will form part of a series that will each carry plants. SC-3 gains its sci-fi title by riffing on the word craft. ''It's a space 'craft' with three pointed legs,'' says Frankland.

 

LEGO for litle architects.

LEGO for litle architects.

COMMUNITY HUBBUB

From Brooklyn to Melbourne, communities dealing with poverty and violent crime are using architecture to improve health and lives. For its keynote event, Community and Architecture: Cultural Appropriations, the Melbourne Architecture Annual festival invites the public to a panel discussion with those architects working in the breach. Given the theme of Community & Architecture, it's fitting that one of Melbourne's most popular cultural hubs should act as home to the 2012 event. Coinciding with Federation Square's 10th anniversary, the program includes a series of exhibitions, film, tours, talks and workshops. Some of the event's highlights include LEGO for Little Architects (October 28). Melbourne Architecture Annual 2012, October 22-28; melbournearchitecture.org

 

Six Degrees' Hanging Rock House.

Six Degrees' Hanging Rock House.

DEGREES OF SUCCESS

Six Degrees' reputation has been built on bars: Meyers Place, Riverland and Three Below are just a few of its creations. So, for an exhibition of its work as part of Melbourne University's alumni series, naturally, they are installing a bar. Surrounding it will be a cocktail of work. From the recent award-winning, multi-residential project Heller Street Park and Residences, to its work on the hipster Crumpler retail outlets and its strikingly sober Hanging Rock House (pictured), Greatest Hits 1992-2012 will feature drawings, sketches, documentary photography and film, and art projects. Wunderlich Gallery, Melbourne University Architecture Building, Oct 19-Nov 23. 

ray.edgar@bigpond.com