Tony Robinson looks at the enormous reconstruction program that began after the 2011 earthquake in Christchurch.

Tony Robinson looks at the enormous reconstruction program that began after the 2011 earthquake in Christchurch.

Monday, History, 7.30pm

It has been great fun watching Tony Robinson strolling around cities, towns and suburbs across Australia. From Hobart to Fremantle, he has unearthed a treasure trove of fascinating historical stories and modern curiosities. It has been a little hit-and-miss, though, and this season the parts where Robinson gets passers-by to help with historical re-enactments have fallen a bit flat. Tonight's episode on Christchurch (Robinson's first trip across the Tasman) provides an example. His re-enactment of the struggle for women's suffrage involves little more than dividing a bunch of locals into two camps and getting them to jeer at each other. Still, Robinson provides some interesting context. In any case, such invention is the child of necessity; Robinson often has little to work with in the visual sense. Tonight, at the childhood home of war hero Charles Upham, Robinson recreates the actions for which Upham was awarded the Victoria Cross by darting about the garden, using a rake as a rifle. If it were somebody else it could come across as disrespectful, but with Robinson it's clearly coming from a place of great regard - and it works reasonably well. Elsewhere, Robinson looks at the enormous reconstruction program that began after the 2011 earthquake, taking in everything from modest archaeological finds on demolition sites to new shops and cafes made of converted shipping containers and the grand ''Cardboard Cathedral'' being erected as a temporary replacement for Christchurch Cathedral.