Australian Foreign Minister Julie Bishop is greeted by Indonesian counterpart Marty Natalegawa before their meeting in Jakarta, Indonesia.

Australian Foreign Minister Julie Bishop is greeted by Indonesian counterpart Marty Natalegawa before their meeting in Jakarta, Indonesia. Photo: Tatan Syuflana

Julie Bishop has arrived in Jakarta with a high-level delegation of bureaucrats and advisers to try to hose down Indonesian anger at recent spying allegations.

The Australian Foreign Minister arrived at Indonesia's Foreign Affairs Ministry at about 11.15am local time (3.15pm AEDT) for what is expected to be a long bilateral meeting, including a working lunch, with her counterpart Marty Natalegawa.

Ms Bishop was accompanied by Peter Varghese, the head of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, and a former head of the Office of National Assessments, and Dennis Richardson, the head of the Defence Department.

She also had with her Andrew Shearer, a national security adviser to Prime Minister Tony Abbott, and her own senior adviser, Robert Ferguson. 

On the way in to the meeting, the two foreign ministers smiled and exchanged pleasantries as Ms Bishop introduced her travelling party and signed the visitor's book.

Mr Natalegawa has made it clear that this meeting is the start of the first step in the lengthy six-step process outlined by President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono before relations between the two countries can be normalised.

On Wednesday, Mr Natalegawa said he had no particular agenda for the meeting beyond challenging Ms Bishop for a clear explanation of the extent of Australian spying.

“The ball is now in the hands of Australia on how to carry out the six points of the road map [to restore relations],” he said.

“We need to draw a line before we can move forward.

"We need to be informed of what took place in the past so that there will be no more shocks, no more surprises to the system.

"It is best for the two designated parties to sit together and chat.”