Last word: The best of our readers' Letters, comments and posts

A man pushes a trolley beside fallen trees and power lines on a street in Santiago de Cuba

A man pushes a trolley beside fallen trees and power lines on a street in Santiago de Cuba Photo: Desmond Boylan, Reuters

Every week The Herald receives thousands of comments, Tweets, Facebook posts and Letters to the Editor. These are some of this week's best.

Join the conversation at smh.com.au; facebook.com/sydneymorningherald; twitter.com/smh and write to us at letters@smh.com.au

On post-tropical cyclone Sandy

We are repeatedly reminded not to attribute any individual weather event to global warming ("A land of hurricanes and heroes", November 1). It's seen as "pushing" a climate change agenda. This is wearing incredibly thin. We've seen record floods in Queensland, Pakistan and Bangladesh, torrential rain in Sydney, the worst-ever drought in East Africa, a "snap drought" in parts of the US and now Sandy the Frankenstorm. Blind Freddy can appreciate these extreme events are much more frequent. Eminent scientists such as Professor Matthew England are telling us climate change may not be creating weather events like Sandy, but they sure-as-eggs are intensifying them. Isn't it the extreme nature of these events that are so devastating? There's a T-shirt that says: "I'm not as smart as a climate scientist, but I'm smart enough to listen to them." That about sums it up.

Thea Ormerod, Letters to the Editor

Waiting for #Sandy to set in here in the East Village. Lines for wine store are around the block. Make of that what you will....#Sandy

@LizBradtke to @smh on Twitter

It is just a storm.Like here in Australia,people want to live in well known areas they will have to put up with it.I live in north Queensland and cyclones are a fact of life.With out these storms our ecosystems will not survive!

Josephine Dance, facebook.com/sydneymorningherald

 

On Maisie Kate Miller, the girl who used pigtail power to stop bullying

A lovely story. Thanks for writing it - and let's hope this attitude spreads and is able to defuse some more bullying situations. They are everywhere.

Lola, smh.com.au

Well done Maisie

Shani Mcgeachie, facebook.com/sydneymorningherald

It seems you promote bullying the bully. And you suggest to never forgive. It's true some people will always be bullies (sociopathic). However, most bullies are people with their own sad issues, and who just need to be made aware of what they are doing and the effect they are having, and helped to develop empathy. Everyone makes mistakes and can change, so to never forgive is inhumane.

Ex-Bully, smh.com.au

 

On Sydney hippest high streets

I lived in Newtown for years back in the eighties and nineties. It was always a great place to eat, listen to music and eat. Refurbishments may be nice, but I think I would prefer it when it was a little less homogenised

Dee, smh.com.au

Was in Oxford Street, Paddo, not long ago and was astonished at the lack of people about. It was like a ghost town. Couldn't find a decent coffee shop.

Gary Chow, facebook.com/sydneymorningherald

The warzone aspect of Oxford St Paddington has certainly played a part in the demise. The paving patched with asphalt creating trip hazards, the median strip down Oxford St removed, the plastic barriers - it just is not a pleasant atmosphere. It's been 18 months and counting in this state. Sure retail can adapt, but those Paddington retailers have been fighting a losing battle with the ongoing works.

PPP, smh.com.au

 

On Israel Folau quitting AFL

Lost the passion, that wasn't OBVIOUS from half way through the season.

@Pandabattlemode to @smh on Twitter

Smart man, got his cash now going back to the game he's good at.

Ned Thiele, facebook.com/sydneymorningherald

Why is it always AFL v NRL?? He was never going to be that good at AFL. It's a tough game to learn.

Tim Watt, facebook.com/sydneymorningherald

The great experiment of Israel Folau moving to the AFL may be viewed by some as a grand failure but I don't believe that this is the case. I certainly believe that the AFL has gained the marketing value for GWS and for that reason it is money well spent. To my mind both he and Karmichael Hunt have had success in their new code. Far more interesting now is the question 'What does a NRL superstar now bring back to NRL?' If he is re-converted into a standard NRL player by a 'normal' coach I have no doubt he will return to his own brilliant standard. But consider this. In the hands of an innovative and forward thinking coach, an Israel Folau with the experience and strategy of another code, may well be able to think and play outside of the box ... and take his team with him.

This may be an opportunity to see NRL change in a way we cannot imagine. I'm quite excited at the prospect!

Ian Henricus, Letters

Letter of the week

I bet Wayne Swan would like to borrow the NSW bureaucrats and Auditor-General who can turn a $337 million deficit into a $680 million surplus. The mind boggles that we pay the public service fat cats to produce such blunders, explained away as data input errors. The pollies only rely on what they are told.

Gavin Williamson, Letters