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Federal Politics

Politics Live: Audit Commission aftermath

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With that, it is just about time we rode off into the sunset. To think about the meaning of Federation and whether we would be better connected if we went for a run around parliament at 5.30am.

But before that, what did we learn?

 

Many thanks from Alex Ellinghausen, Andrew Meares and I.

Enjoy the weekend. But not too much.

Remember: prosperity is not a gift. It has to be earned.

 

 

 

 

As we bask in the post COAG glow, Andrew Meares has a puzzle for you.

And it is harder than you think.

 

It being Friday, it is also time for a briefing on Operation Sovereign Borders.

(Remember the days of those weekly press conferences? Seems like years ago now, given all the stoof that's happened this year.)

Immigration Minister Scott Morrison has issued a statement to say that there have been "FOUR FULL CALENDAR MONTHS WITHOUT A SUCCESSFUL PEOPLE SMUGGLING VENTURE".

The press release also reminds us that four months is also equal to a third of the year.

Commander of OSB Angus Campbell was seen getting a coffee at Aussie's at Parliament House earlier today.

Perhaps toasting the boat-preventing success of his efforts.

 

What's the collective noun for premiers?

Prime Minister Tony Abbott with state premiers and chief ministers at the COAG press conference. Photo: Andrew Meares

Prime Minister Tony Abbott with state premiers and chief ministers at the COAG press conference. Photo: Andrew Meares

After that 40 minute effort (quite brief for a COAG presser), Tony Abbott wraps things up.

The PM's office say a date has not been set yet for the next COAG meeting.

Back to the GST.

Tasmania and South Australia are not as keen as the likes of WA about a change in the way the tax is distributed.

SA Premier Jay Weatherill is asked for his views and replies by taking a big 'ol swipe at Colin Barnett (who is sitting but two seats away).

"They have struck it rich and they have decided they want to essentially cut themselves adrift from the rest of the Federation, which I think is intellectually bankrupt and also morally bankrupt, says Weatherill.

(With this, the PM gives Barnett a pat on the arm.)

The Prime Minister when asked for his reaction to Gallacher says he "can't comment on matters that I have been absent from". 

TA explains that he has been in a COAG meeting and isn't familiar with what may or may not have happened today in Sydney.

 

Mike Baird is asked a question about Mike Gallacher.

But the PM rules it out of order.

(It is not about COAG).

Baird says he will address the media later this afternoon on his stood-aside cops minister.

 

One of the (many) headline recommendations out of the Aud Com report yesterday was that the feds should hand over responsibility for schools and hospitals to the states.

The PM is asked if he has a view on this.

Tony Abbott says that it's a "proper" subject for discussion, but adopts a wait and see approach for now (given the white papering going on).

"Let's see where this discussion goes because we're at the beginning of a process."

He is also asked about the recommendation that states could levy income tax.

"The last thing I want to see is any idea of double taxation," the PM replies.

"People are perfectly entitled to put things on the table ... but in the end ... if there is to be any substantial change, obviously it has to be something which is supported by the Commonwealth government. And obviously it would go to an election."

While you're getting excited about GST changes, Tony Abbott leaps in to say:

"I want to stress that the position the Commonwealth government took to the election [is], we have no plans for change in this area..."

"Walk in my shoes, Denis."

So says Colin Barnett to the Victorian Premier, after Napthine complained about GST distribution (and Victoria not getting enough.)

There has been some speculation that COAG today would be asked to delay or change the approach to the NDIS.

(This also follows a recommendation from the Audit Commission that the timelines be slowed down for the roll out.)

The ACT's Chief Minister Katy Gallagher has just scuttled this.

"I was really pleased that COAG agreed to proceed as agreed previously with the NDIS," she says.

"We are proceeding with the timetables as agreed."

On his way in to COAG this morning, Mike Baird, had also hosed down a slow down.

"We have no intention to renegotiate [the timelines," he said.

The timelines for the NDIS, which is supposed to be fully rolled out by 2019, are agreed in bilateral agreements between states, territories and the federal government.

The NDIS board (with the help of KPMG) is also reporting to the federal government on timelines/capacity around the rollout for the scheme. This is due sometime in the first half of the year.

Yesterday's Commission of Audit report made many recommendations about streamlining the relationship between states and territories (as well as the suggesting that states be able to tax incomes ...)

In his introductory comments today, the PM notes that a Federation White Paper is coming.

(It was an election commitment for the government to have a paper on reform of the relationship between the Commonwealth and the states within two years.)

The White Paper will have buy in from states, territories and local government, Tony Abbott says.

"It will be a constructive and collegial operation."

In other words:

Peace.

Prime Minister Tony Abbott with state premiers and chief ministers at the COAG press conference. Photo: Andrew Meares

Prime Minister Tony Abbott with state premiers and chief ministers at the COAG press conference. Photo: Andrew Meares

With that announcement (or confirmation of announcement - given the 70 thing has been much reported this morning), we leave the Treasurer in Melbourne.

And hop to the Main Committee Room at Parliament House for the post-COAG press fest.

Tony Abbott is addressing reporters.

Telling us for the 795,683th time that he wants to be the Infrastructure Prime Minister.

(Oh, TA, we know!)

ACT Chief Minister Katy Gallagher, Tasmanian Premier Will Hodgman, NSW Premier Mike Baird, Queensland Premier Campbell Newman, Prime Minister Tony Abbott, WA Premier Colin Barnett, Victorian Premier Denis Napthine, SA Premier Jay Weatherill and NT Chief Minister Adam Giles address the media during a joint press conference on Friday. Photo: Alex Ellinghausen

ACT Chief Minister Katy Gallagher, Tasmanian Premier Will Hodgman, NSW Premier Mike Baird, Queensland Premier Campbell Newman, Prime Minister Tony Abbott, WA Premier Colin Barnett, Victorian Premier Denis Napthine, SA Premier Jay Weatherill and NT Chief Minister Adam Giles address the media during a joint press conference on Friday. Photo: Alex Ellinghausen

Joe Hockey says that the government is "not in the business of shocking people".

Those who are 65 now will not lose their pensions.

But he confirms that the Coalition will introduce legislation to lift the pension age to 70 by 2035.

And he expects there to be bipartisan support when this happens.

 

The Treasurer moves on to discuss the "demographic challenges" before Australia.

(i.e. the increasing number of oldies)

"We should celebrate that we're all living longer," he begins. "That's a good thing, I encourage it."

BUT

"One area that needs to be properly addressed it, the eligibility for the age pension."

The budget meetings - where ministers come to a cabinet committee to plead for spending in their portfolios - must have been tough going.

Joe Hockey says he has told his colleagues not to come to him with spending proposals unless they have a bigger savings proposal.

"Any new proposals to spend money must [be] more than funded through offsetting savings."

 

The Treasurer continues to deliver to good news here.

"The biggest surprise of coming into government is [the budget's] it's as bad as I thought it would be."

 

Hockey refers to the speech he gave in London two years ago, calling for an end to the "Age of Entitlement".

"This budget will seek to replace the culture of entitlement with a culture of enterprise," he tells the lunching audience.

And in news that will surely come as a cozy comfort those on low incomes:

"There's no such thing as a free visit to a doctor, there's no such thing as free welfare ... every Australian is in one form or another, a taxpayer."

The Treasurer quotes his father.

"Prosperity is not a gift, it has to be earned."

Joe Hockey is at the Grand Hyatt in Melbourne, addressing the Australia-Israel Chamber of Commerce.

This is his last pre-budget speech.

"In just eleven days I will deliver the first budget of the Abbott government. It will be the budget that we were elected to deliver," he begins.

On that note, the PM and his running buddies/state premiers will hold a press conference from Parliament House at 1.30pm.

Michaela Whitbourn and Kate McClymont have been writing earlier this morning that NSW Police Minister Mike Gallacher has been drawn into a cash-for-favour scandal, after ICAC heard he had hatched a "corrupt scheme" with Nathan Tinkler's property group to receive illegal donations.

Expect NSW Premier Mike Baird to be asked about this in the post-COAG press conference this afternoon.

In state politics news, ICAC has claimed another scalp.

 

Bill Shorten and Jenny Macklin have been hanging out the age pensioners in Melbourne.

They have jumped on the news re: the pension age increase.

Macklin argues this is a BP.

"No change to pensions is what Tony Abbott said to all Australians before the election," she tells reporters.

In a way, Macklin urges Hockey to go further.

"Now that Joe Hockey has come out and confirmed that he is going to put up the age pension age, he should also make clear what other changes he is going to make as a result of the Commission of Audit."

Indeed, when it comes to pensions, increasing the age pension age was not the only recommendation in the report yesterday.

"We have age pensioners here in this community who are very worried about what is going to happen," Macklin says.

 

The Treasurer also opined that he finds the wind turbines near Canberra (they are near Bungendore and can be seen from the road that runs along Lake George) "utterly offensive".

"I think they are just a blight on the landscape."

Hockey said he could not "knock" the subsidies associated with the turbines, however, because they were in locked-in schemes.

The Treasurer also hinted strongly that politicians' entitlements will be on the chopping block on budget night.

"I can't confirm where we're heading with that, because that is a matter for the budget, but I hear what you say and we hear what you say."

Now, before Joe Hockey comes up in Melbourne today to tell us about the age pension, he has had a chat to Alan Jones on Macquarie Radio.

During the exchange, the Treasurer revealed that he grew up listening to Engelbert Humperdinck every Sunday.

(To be fair, it did come out in the transcript as Inkleburt Humpdidink, so we are making a leap here.)

Also discussed during the interview was the Audit Commission.

Well, sort of.

Jones said that he was not going to go into the Commission of Audit "in detail" (given it was a report to government) ... but Hockey did observe that the report has "fed into our budget deliberations".

When Jones said "you're not going to have a debt levy, are you?", Hockey replied: "Well, Alan ..."

 

 

And just because we believe in safe exercising, he's a shot of the Prime Minister en stretch.

 

Prime Minister Tony Abbott stretches ahead of his early morning run. Photo: Alex Ellinghausen

Prime Minister Tony Abbott stretches ahead of his early morning run. Photo: Alex Ellinghausen

Things were not so fun for Newman's press sec Mitch Grayson (who can be seen in the background with his arms inside his t-shirt).

He is from Queensland, after all.

NSW Premier Mike Baird, Queensland Premier Campbell Newman and Prime Minister Tony Abbott ahead of their early morning run from Parliament House to Lake Burley Griffin.
Photo: Alex Ellinghausen

NSW Premier Mike Baird, Queensland Premier Campbell Newman and Prime Minister Tony Abbott ahead of their early morning run from Parliament House to Lake Burley Griffin. Photo: Alex Ellinghausen

Much earlier this morning, in the pre-dawn darkness, Baird joined the PM and Queensland colleague Campbell Newman for a jog from Parliament House to Lake Burley Griffin.

The PM is a busy man. Who also likes to exercise.

So joining him during one of his workouts is a great way to keep in touch.

(Do you think the other premiers feel left out or relieved?)

NSW Premier Mike Baird, Prime Minister Tony Abbott and Queensland Premier Campbell Newman during an early morning run on Friday.
Photo: Alex Ellinghausen

NSW Premier Mike Baird, Prime Minister Tony Abbott and Queensland Premier Campbell Newman during an early morning run on Friday. Photo: Alex Ellinghausen

The PM was also right on hand to put newbie Premier Mike Baird through his paces.

It's always handy to know exactly where to sign.

Prime Minister Tony Abbott with NSW state premier Mike Baird signing the Asset Recycling Agreement. Photo: Andrew Meares

Prime Minister Tony Abbott with NSW state premier Mike Baird signing the Asset Recycling Agreement. Photo: Andrew Meares

Over in COAG land, the Prime Minister and state premiers and chief ministers signed up to a federal government plan to recycle assets.

As James Massola writes, the package is designed to spur the states to sell their old assets and put the money back into new infrastructure investment.

It will provide states with an extra 15 per cent of the sale value of their assets in the process.

 

 

Prime Minister Tony Abbott with state premiers after signing an Asset Recycling Agreement on Friday. Photo: Andrew Meares

Prime Minister Tony Abbott with state premiers after signing an Asset Recycling Agreement on Friday. Photo: Andrew Meares

Seriously, the deficit will be like *this* big.

National Commission of Audit Chair, Tony Shepherd, in discussion with Senator Richard Di Natale, after the Senate hearing.
Photo: Alex Ellinghausen

National Commission of Audit Chair, Tony Shepherd, in discussion with Senator Richard Di Natale, after the Senate hearing. Photo: Alex Ellinghausen

Handshakes don't cost a thing.

National Commission of Audit Chair, Tony Shepherd, in discussion with Senator Richard Di Natale, after the Senate hearing.
Photo: Alex Ellinghausen

National Commission of Audit Chair, Tony Shepherd, in discussion with Senator Richard Di Natale, after the Senate hearing. Photo: Alex Ellinghausen

The Senate hearing has wrapped up in Canberra.

(But not before Sam Dastyari threw something of a rouge herring at Shepherd - quizzing him on a Transfield connection to ICAC. Shepherd was chair of the construction giant until last October.)

After two hours of slightly testy questioning, we can report that things ended with a handshake between the Audit Commission head and the chair of the Senate committee, Richard Di Natale.

 

Senator Sam Dastyari puts a question to National Commission of Audit Chair, Tony Shepherd.
Photo: Alex Ellinghausen

Senator Sam Dastyari puts a question to National Commission of Audit Chair, Tony Shepherd. Photo: Alex Ellinghausen

The Senate inquiry is starting to wind up. But Labor's Sam Dastyari is given a last crack at questioning.

The Labor senator asks about the business, rather than the community focus of the Commission.

Shepherd says that he is the only one of the five commissioners with a purely business background

You haven't felt that it's a disproportionately conservative makeup?

(For example, Amanda Vanstone is a former Howard government minister, and Peter Boxhall is a former chief-of-staff to Peter Costello.)

"I would think that we're a fairly eclectic [bunch]," says Shepherd, who until recently was the president of the Business Council of Australia.  

 

 

 

Di Natale then turns to the Audit Commission recommendation that single people on incomes above $88,000 should be paying for their own healthcare (taking out private health insurance).

"We do not want to end up in a US-style [health system]," says Shepherd.

Di Natale asks how this could be avoided under the Audit Commission's recommendations. In the current system, Medicare control costs, he argues.

Shepherd replies that the existing health system is becoming "unaffordable".

 

 

 

National Commission of Audit chair Tony Shepherd during a Senate hearing the day after the release of the National Commission of Audit Report.
Photo: Alex Ellinghausen

National Commission of Audit chair Tony Shepherd during a Senate hearing the day after the release of the National Commission of Audit Report. Photo: Alex Ellinghausen

Meanwhile, in the Senate committee rooms, Richard Di Natale is going after Tony Shepherd over the Audit Commission's recommendation to introduce a GP co-payment.

And has he landed a punch here?

Di Natale (who is also a medical doctor), questions Shepherd about the proposed charges to people who present to hospital emergency with complaints with less urgent problems.

The Greens Senator uses the example of someone who drinks a bottle of Grange at home (touché) and has a rich meal and then presents to hospital with chest pains. And of someone who has a lump on their leg that is growing ever more painful.

Because of the risk of heart attack, the wine/food case is seen as hospital-worthy (and not charged for). The leg lump is not seen as urgent and is charged for.

Di Natale then concludes by noting that the wine/food turns out to be indigestion, while the lump is bone cancer.

Where's the logic in that?

"We haven't drilled into the detail of this," Shepherd protests.

An exasperated Di Natale shoots back: "But you're recommending it!"

Senator Richard Di Natale puts a question to National Commission of Audit chair Tony Shepherd.
Photo: Alex Ellinghausen

Senator Richard Di Natale puts a question to National Commission of Audit chair Tony Shepherd. Photo: Alex Ellinghausen

Political correspondent James Massola has written on Joe Hockey's impending announcement on retirement age.

Australians born after 1965 will have to work until they are 70 before they are eligible for the age pension.

The Treasurer will announce this in a speech to the Australia-Israel Chamber of Commerce in Melbourne at 1pm.

The age pension is already rising from 65 to 67 by 2023. This new policy will see the pension age keep rising until 2035.

Sleeves up, Australia.

And put that hammock in cold storage.

Sam Dastyari has questioned Shepherd on his manta that the "best thing" we can do for people is to "create jobs".

What then of the recommendation to cut 15,000 public service jobs?

Shepherd says he is not sure where that 15,000 figure has come from.

But he goes on to argue that taxpayers money needs to be spent "wisely".

"We should not employ public servants inefficiently," he says.

"We have a sacred obligation to make sure our public service is as efficient and economic as it can be."

 

ACT Labor Senator Kate Lundy has been quizzing Shepherd on what the Audit Commission's recommendations mean for Canberra.

The report recommends big cuts to the public service - including in the Departments of Education and Defence. And suggests that government services such as visa processing and the Centrelink payments system should be outsourced.

Lundy is worried about the impact on Canberra. After the Howard government came in in 1996, Canberra suffered big job cuts in the public service, and as result, the housing market slumped and times were tough (for a while).

Shepherd insists that he sees this as an "opportunity, not a knockback" for the ACT.

 

National Commission of Audit chair Tony Shepherd is questioned by Senators Sam Dastyari, Kate Lundy and Richard Di Natale during a Senate hearing the day after the Audit Commission report was released. Photo: Alex Ellinghausen

National Commission of Audit chair Tony Shepherd is questioned by Senators Sam Dastyari, Kate Lundy and Richard Di Natale during a Senate hearing the day after the Audit Commission report was released. Photo: Alex Ellinghausen

Keeping an eye on the pension age news, we head back to the Senate hearing, where Tony Shepherd and the head of his secretariat, Peter Crone, have just been asked how much the Audit Commission report has cost.

They had a budget of about $1 million.

And have come in at about $750,000.

They wouldn't be a proper Audit Commission is they didn't make cuts to themselves, one supposes.

 

In breaking news, Treasurer Joe Hockey is set to lift the retirement age to 70 by 2035 today.

This is almost two decades earlier than the 2053 timeline recommended by the Audit Commission.

This would come after Labor introduced changes in 2009 that would see the pension age raise from 65 to 67 between 2017 and 2023.

Even before the Audit Commission, the government has recently been making noises about raising the pension age.

The number of Australians aged between 65 and 84 is set to double between 2010 and 2050. The number of those over 85 will quadruple.

The Treasurer is due to make a speech in Melbourne at lunchtime, where he will make the announcement.

 

 

While the Senate committee settles into a post-Macdonald rhythm, Prime Minister Tony Abbott has opened the first Council of Australian Governments meeting for the year.

Everyone has squeezed into the Cabinet room.

The PM particularly welcomes NSW Premier Mike Baird and Tasmanian Premier Will Hodgman to their first COAGs. 

(Surely what most premier aspirants dream of when they envisage what the job will entail.)

TA says that there some "quite significant items" on the agenda.

Like infrastructure.

He has just told the room that he hopes to be the "Infrastructure Prime Minister". 

This is fast becoming a catch cry.

Prime Minister Tony Abbott meets with state Premiers and Chief Ministers for COAG at Parliament House in Canberra on Friday. Photo: Alex Ellinghausen

Prime Minister Tony Abbott meets with state Premiers and Chief Ministers for COAG at Parliament House in Canberra on Friday. Photo: Alex Ellinghausen

With that, Macdonald is off to catch his plane, and Dastyari gets the conch once more.

The Labor senator asks a question that is not about the report.

What's your view on a debt levy?

"I haven't really got a view on it," Shepherd replies. "I really haven't worked on it. I've been so concentrating on getting this report out."

When pressed by Dastyari, he says that the levy and his report are "unrelated".

That is, the government could, if it wanted to, adopt a levy and implement a large majority of the recommendations in the Audit Commission report.

 


Ian Macdonald, listening in via phone, has a plane to catch.

So he gets the next question.

The Queensland Coalition senator is grateful for the opportunity. But he notes he has not read the report yet.

"I confess, I haven't set eyes on it yet."

(It has been available on the web since 2pm yesterday.)

Perhaps this is why Macdonald goes for a more general question.

Could I just ask you to explain what exactly it was the government asked you to look at when setting up the Commission of Audit?

National Commission of Audit chair Tony Shepherd is questioned by Senator Ian Macdonald via teleconference.
Photo: Alex Ellinghausen

National Commission of Audit chair Tony Shepherd is questioned by Senator Ian Macdonald via teleconference. Photo: Alex Ellinghausen

Labor's Sam Dastyari has clearly solved the problem of what to ask Tony Shepherd.

He is the first questioner, and kicks off with: 

Mr Shepherd, there are tens of thousands of families who woke up this morning and just heard about this Commission of Audit and have found out that your report recommends cutting services and government support that they rely on, that they need.

What do you say to those families today?

The Audit Commission head replies that a budget "hole" has to be filled.

"We've tried to spread it fairly, we think equitably across the community. And that is, I guess, up to the government whether it accepts it or rejects it."

The GST recommendation was seized upon by a chipper WA Premier Colin Barnett on his way into the COAG meeting this morning.

(Barnett has long argued that WA does not receive its fair share.)

"The four biggest states - NSW, Victoria, Queensland and WA - have already agreed last year that the GST should be allocated on a per-capita basis and obviously that's something that I, as a Western Australian Premier, have been campaigning for for the last five years," he said.

 

WA Premier Colin Barnett arrives for the COAG meeting at Parliament House on Friday. Photo: Alex Ellinghausen

WA Premier Colin Barnett arrives for the COAG meeting at Parliament House on Friday. Photo: Alex Ellinghausen

At last, Tony Shepherd gets to give his opening statement.

"I think the report speaks for itself," he says.

He notes that the Commission did go a little bit out of the terms of reference by looking at two tax issues

(The committee was not asked to look at revenue issues, but the report recommends that state governments be allowed to raise income taxes, which would vary from state to state and that GST is split between states based on population, not economic need.)

"We could not look at the federation without looking at the GST itself," Shepherd explains. 

 

National Commission of Audit chair Tony Shepherd during the Senate hearing.
Photo: Alex Ellinghausen

National Commission of Audit chair Tony Shepherd during the Senate hearing. Photo: Alex Ellinghausen

Macdonald wants the hearing postponed.

Di Natale (who is chair) says that members were first notified there might be a hearing last Thursday. This was then confirmed on Monday.

The Greens senator tries to go to opening statements, but Macdonald's disembodied voice buts in.

"This is an outrageous abuse ...!"

Tony Shepherd only gets a couple of words into his opening statement, before Macdonald butts in again ...

"You are being extremely disrespectful to the Senate ..."

Something tells me that it is going to be very hard to control/ contain Macdonald via this medium.

 

Before opening statements are allowed, Queensland Coalition senator Ian Macdonald, who is present via phone, is protesting.

WA Coalition senator Alan Eggleston is also patching in via phone.

Due to the late notice of the hearing, they have been unable to attend in person.

Macdonald wants to know if any other government senators are present in person.

(No, they are not.)

"This makes a complete farce of the whole ... system," Macdonald says.

He adds that witnesses cannot be seriously questioned over such a big report the day after it was handed down.

The Senate hearing has just kicked off.

A little late, Richard Di Natale's apologises, explaining his plane was late.

Labor's Sam Dastyari is also on the committee and is preparing his attack.

Following yesterday's bumper report (86 recommendations and all that), there has of course been no shortage of Reaction (with a capital R) today.

The Sydney Morning Herald's Economics Editor Ross Gittins tells us not to be too alarmed, however.

"Few of [the report's] recommendations will make it into the budget on Tuesday week. They were never intended too."

The Age's Economics Editor Peter Martin writes that something is missing from those 5 kilos worth of reporting.

In a word?

Tax.

Peter makes the point that while age pensioners copped a beating in the Audit Commission report, superannuants got off free as a scot. 

 

 

The Senate hearing into the Audit Commission is due to start at 9am.

You can watch it live via the parliamentary website.

The inquiry was set up last December and is chaired by Greens senator Richard Di Natale.

The committee is expected to report back by May 13 (budget day) and has already had six public hearings.

Today's hearing with Tony Shepherd was organised after the date of the Audit Commission report hand down was made public.

This will not be Shepherd's first sortie with the committee. The Audit Commission head has appeared before, back in January, before the first phase of the report was given to the government in February.

 

Good morning and welcome to the national capital on a morning that is actually quite cold.

(And here was you thinking that Canberra stereotypes aren't true.)

 

It's the day after the day of the Audit Commission Report. As premiers arrive in Canberra for the first COAG of the year, the head of the Audit Commission fronts a Senate committee for questioning ...

Tony Shepherd will appear before the Senate's Select Committee into the Abbott Government's Commission of Audit this morning, along with the head of the Commission's secretariat, Peter Crone.

Treasurer Joe Hockey addresses the media during a joint press conference after the release of the National Commission of Audit Report on Thursday.
Photo: Alex Ellinghausen

Treasurer Joe Hockey addresses the media during a joint press conference after the release of the National Commission of Audit Report on Thursday. Photo: Alex Ellinghausen

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