Federal Politics

Politics Live: June 17, 2014

As Gough Whitlam might say: it's time.

But before we head off into the evening to freak out about what to wear to the Midwinter Ball, what did we learn?

 

Thanks for tuning in today. Alex Ellinghausen, Andrew Meares and I will see you tomorrow.

Adios!

 

 

Labor's Mark Bishop, who was elected to the Senate in 1996 is now giving his valedictory speech.

The WA Senator begins with a humungo thanks to his wife and two daughters.

Time in politics is served by "the entire family," he says.

There is a long line up of senators to congratulate Ron Boswell.

Even Christine Milne is there, despite those digs at environmentalists.

As she shakes Boswell's hand, Milne notes "after all I the help I gave you with bananas and ginger!"

"One of the things that has given me the greatest pleasure is seeing Barnaby Joyce emerge ... as a future leader of the National Party," Boswell adds.

Both Trussy and Barney are in the chamber to hear the valedictory speech.

But it's not awks!

The outgoing senator says that Truss has the "total loyalty" of the Nationals party room.

 

"I've always been a voice for traditional family values," Boswell says, recalling his opposition to abortion and porn.

He describes his defeat of Pauline Hanson in the 2001 election as his "greatest political achievement".

 

Back to top

Boswell notes how he has always opposed environmental activists and their scare campaigns.

He says he is proud to say he has given the environment a "bloody nose" on more than one occasion.

 

Nationals senator Ron Boswell is giving his valedictory speech in the Senate.

(Yup, he might not be a fan of the paid parental leave scheme, but his term ends on June 30.)

He has been around Parliament for AGES, having been elected in 1983.

(Boswell says he is the sixth longest serving Senator.)

No wonder both Tony Abbott and Warren Truss have journeyed to the red room to hear him speak.

And Audi Clive

Palmer United Party leader Clive Palmer departs QT. Photo: Alex Ellinghausen
Palmer United Party leader Clive Palmer departs QT. Photo: Alex Ellinghausen 

Clive with warning

Greens MP Adam Bandt, Palmer United Party leader Clive Palmer and Independent MP Andrew Wilkie during question time. ...
Greens MP Adam Bandt, Palmer United Party leader Clive Palmer and Independent MP Andrew Wilkie during question time. Photo: Alex Ellinghausen 

Stealth Clive

Clive Palmer during question time. Photo: Andrew Meares
Clive Palmer during question time. Photo: Andrew Meares 
Back to top

The time being 5.01pm, we now present PHOTOS WITHOUT NOTICE*

*The Clive in the House special.

"This is a very fluid situation ... we're following it minute by minute."

Foreign Minister Julie Bishop is on Sky News talking about Iraq. 

She confirms that Australia's focus is still on protecting the Australians who are there.

And that Iraq don't want Australian troops on the ground.

She is also adamant that there is no change in government policy towards Israel and Palestine.

 

While we're talking about the budget, we note an excerpt of the NSW Treasurer's budget speech today:

"There is no point pretending that the broken agreements of the federal budget won’t hurt the people of New South Wales ... The Commonwealth should suspend its cuts until a review of the federation can be completed," Andrew Constance said.

"In the next four years alone, $2 billion will be wiped off our books with National Partnerships and agreements in health, education and pensioner and senior concessions cut off by Canberra."

Joe Hockey, Warren Truss and Tony Abbott during question time. Photo: Andrew Meares
Joe Hockey, Warren Truss and Tony Abbott during question time. Photo: Andrew Meares 

The GP co-payment continues to noodle itself.

Health correspondent Dan Harrison reports that Liberal MP Angus Taylor has incorrectly told his constituents that the proposed $7 payment will not apply to those who can't afford to pay it.

 

After question time, Tasmanian independent Andrew Wilkie moved to suspend standing orders over Iraq.

He wanted the Parliament to call on the PM to provide a "clear public statement" ruling out Australia sending combat forces to Iraq.

And to initiate a royal commission into the 2003 invasion of Iraq.

"There is an urgent need to understand what Australia's intentions are at this point in time," he said.

Wilkie was seconded by Greens MP Adam Bandt.

Leader of the House Christopher Pyne then complained that the government was not told in advance of the motion.

"Today is not the day for it," he argues.

The motion is put to a vote, with only Wilkie and Bandt voting in support.

 

Independent MP Andrew Wilkie moves to suspend standing orders in the House of Representatives. Photo: Alex Ellinghausen
Independent MP Andrew Wilkie moves to suspend standing orders in the House of Representatives. Photo: Alex Ellinghausen 
Back to top
Peter Dutton health minister during question time. Photo: Andrew Meares
Peter Dutton health minister during question time. Photo: Andrew Meares 

"Take your medication."

What do you think?

Assistant Minister for Defence Stuart Robert has the final question - a dixer about ADF gap years.

He ends by telling Shorten that it is a shame he didn't go on one.

"Otherwise you would have learned a thing or two about leadership."

At 3.16pm, Tony Abbott calls an end to question time.

 

Prime Minister Tony Abbott during question time. Photo: Andrew Meares
Prime Minister Tony Abbott during question time. Photo: Andrew Meares 

After letting Labor's Shayne Neumann ask the PM a question on indigenous programs, BS comes back to TA.

This time, the question is allowed.

Yesterday during question time the Prime Minister said: "This is the budget that the Australian people elected us to bring down."

When did the Prime Minister tell the Australian people before the last election that he would cut $80 billion from schools and hospitals, cut pensions, hit families with a GP tax, hit Australians every time they fill up their car with petrol?

"We said we would fix the mess," the PM tells the House.

There is much shoutin'.

Wayne Swan is asked to withdraw a heckle.

And then Tanya Plibersek points out that the Minister for Health said: "take your medication".

"That is highly, highly inappropriate."

Dutton too, is asked to withdraw.

 

Labor MP Wayne Swan during question time. Photo: Alex Ellinghausen
Labor MP Wayne Swan during question time. Photo: Alex Ellinghausen 

A question to Peter Dutton sees the Health Minister return to a favourite Liberal sport of late - Andrew Leigh baiting.

"I want to pay tribute to the member for Fraser, who, as everybody in this place knows, is a political lovechild of Bob Hawke and Jenny Macklin. He is a believer in a co-payment because he wants to make Medicare sustainable," says Dutton.

Leigh interrupts with a point of order:

"The Minister is welcome to say what he likes about my comments at university. If he wants to talk about the present, he might focus on what he said last year while campaigning for election."

(This is a change from Leigh's usual ripostes, which involve him holding up a copies of his recent books.)

 

BS to TA.

And it is an air swing.

I refer to the Prime Minister's previous answers that this is an honest budget. Prime Minister, how on earth can anyone ever believe anything you ever say again?

Madam Speaker rules it out or order.

"It is not a question of substance."

She asks him to rephrase.

"Happy to," Shorten says.

I refer to the Prime Minister's previous answers ... describing the budget as an honest budget and ... that there are no broken promises. How on earth can anyone ever believe anything that this Prime Minister ever says again?

Unsurprisingly, Madam Speaker knocks this one back, too.

"I'm sorry, that's the same question," she says before moving on to the next dixer.

Back to top
Advertisement