Woman pulling hair out, split ends, bad hair, frustration, stress.

Dry shampoo ... an instant hair fix for busy mornings.

The girl in a hurry has had her life made easier by a ''nanna'' product. Dry shampoo, which for years gathered dust on chemist shelves, has been relaunched and transformed as the go-to product on busy mornings. All the big hair players are in the process of launching their own versions but a small Melbourne firm can take the credit for making dry shampoo cool. ''Schwarzkopf was always the flagship product but we saw the potential and became the innovators,'' says Margie Clayton, director of Instant Rock Star.

Clayton recognised that dry shampoo could be more than just a last resort for dirty hair. It could extend the life of a blow-dry. Instantly. It could be a style-enhancing tool that could transform the life of a hair style. In a few sprays. It could absorb natural oils or product build-up, leaving the hair looking freshly washed and styled. In minutes. Instant Rock Star's Dirty Weekend Dry Shampoo was shown at Hair Expo in June last year and with its clever name, young unisex packaging and effectiveness, gained immediate attention. Then came the real innovation at Christmas with the launch of a Dirty Weekend for dark hair. ''We were the first to do it,'' says Clayton. ''Light ones are supposed to brush out but they can make dark hair look grey.'' It's the dark version that flies off the shelves. Next month a medium colour will be launched for people with lighter brown hair.

Hair powders can also be used to revive hair. They all work in the same way - they mess the roots for volume.  

It's good being first - and flattering when others follow. But the downside for Instant Rock Star is price setting, says Clayton. Dirty Weekend retails for $16.95, a lower price point than their competitors' who have come in later. But good news for us.

There are dry shampoos popping up everywhere. Redken has just launched a dry shampoo for all hair colours, Powder Refresh 01, for $27.50. It's great. Matrix Clean Remix is $20.95 ($9.95 for travel size). Garnier is releasing Pure Volume Dry Shampoo in August for $8.95. TRESemme Fresh Start was launched in 2010 at $9.99.

Fresh.Hair by Kevin Murphy has just been launched at $32.95. ''The formulation removes excess oils, odours and all your sins from the night before,'' says Murphy. He says dry shampoo should not be thought of as a hair spray. ''It's not for all over the head. You want to go for a light spray at the roots, the hair line and the part line only. This will avoid the dusty look and remember to either rub the hair with a towel or brush it after the using the spray.'' Fresh.Hair can also be used as a texturiser to create a modern matte look.

Hair powders can also be used to revive hair. They all work in the same way - they mess the roots for volume. Again, Instant Rock Star was an innovator with its Star Dust Weightless Matte Powder ($22.95). Quality men's brand American Crew has come up with Boost Powder ($33.95), an anti-gravity volume powder with a matte finish. It adds grit for dramatic, gravity-defying texture. Hair professionals love Kevin Murphy Powder.Puff ($35.95) for its instant ''oomph''. And Cedel this month launched a dry conditioner ($9.99) - a waterless, no-rinse foam that dissolves into hair to add shine and hydration. L'Oreal hair expert Natalie Perkov has not tried the product but said she would recommend instead using a quality hair oil after a dry shampoo. She suggests Kerastase Elixir Ultime ($49.50), Redken All Soft Argan-6 Oil ($29) or L'Oreal Professionnel Mythic Oil ($38).

Dry shampoos, magic powders and oils - all of these products mean we can hit the snooze button with impunity. What's not to love?