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Goodbye duck face hello squinching

"If you're a human being who wants to look hot ... this is going to do it for you," says creator of the 'squinch' Peter Hurley.

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"If you're a human being who wants to look hot or better or more confident in front of the camera, this is going to do it for you."

New York portrait photographer Peter Hurley thinks he has the antidote to the wide-eyed look many people adopt in pictures in an attempt to appear more photogenic.

Pinch that lower eyelid – just a little bit on the top, a lot on the bottom 

US model Tyra Banks originally came up with "smizing" or "smiling with your eyes". Now Hurley has coined the equally ridiculous term "squinching".

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It is, Hurley says, "my most incredible tip for looking more photogenic on camera".

It is not quite squinting, he says. Scrunching up your eyes and squinting is not cool, Hurley helpfully points out. Nor is it staring, deer-in-headlights style, a la Zoolander, which gives the impression of uncertainty or fear.

Squinching, rather, involves the subtle art of lifting your lower eyelids so that you appear self-assured and smouldering.

"It's all about the squinch," he says. "Confidence comes from the eyes."

Hurley says the squinch takes practice to master. If you go too far you risk "freaking" people out.

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"Don't go crazy with this," he says. "Pinch that lower eyelid – just a little bit on the top, a lot on the bottom."

Then there is Hurley's second top tip for being photogenic. The jawline is not only important, "it's huge", Hurley says. To avoid the dreaded double chin in photos, Hurley suggests jutting your head forward, emu-style, with your chin slightly dropped and your forehead slightly forward.

Just don't overdo it. The techniques are effective only when they are used subtly. You still have to "stand like a normal human being".

"I'm giving this to you as a gift," Hurley says. "You can look awesome. You've got to get this squinching down – you've got to help yourself by squinching."

But remember to practise your squinching, emu-style in front of the mirror before you unleash it on the lens.

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