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Clint Eastwood splits from wife Dina

Hollywood actor and director Clint Eastwood has separated from his second wife Dina after 17 years, according to US media reports.

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Hollywood legend Clint Eastwood and his wife, Dina Eastwood, have separated after 17 years of marriage, according to a report.

The Dirty Harry actor, 83, has been living apart from his second wife, a former television news reporter, for some time, US Weekly says.

Mrs Eastwood, 48, confirmed to the magazine that she and Eastwood remained close but had been living separately.

The couple were married in 1996 and have one daughter together, 16-year-old Morgan. They had not been photographed together in public since 2011.

An unnamed source told the celebrity and entertainment magazine that the pair broke up in June 2012, and that their decision to end their relationship was "amicable".

When US Weekly contacted Eastwood's manager, he said: "I know nothing about that."

Mrs Eastwood last year starred alongside Morgan and her stepdaughter Francesca Eastwood – Clint Eastwood's daughter from a previous relationship – on the E! reality show Mrs Eastwood & Company.

The show followed the family's day-to-day life in Carmel-by-the-Sea, in California.

In April, E! News reported that she had checked into rehab for depression and anxiety issues.

News of the break-up comes one day after another A-list couple, Catherine Zeta-Jones and Michael Douglas, announced that they had split.

"Catherine and Michael are taking some time apart to evaluate and work on their marriage. There will be no further comment," a spokesperson told MailOnline on behalf of the pair.

The pair have faced a tumultuous few years, with the 68-year-old Douglas battling throat cancer and Zeta-Jones, 43, undergoing treatment for bipolar disorder.

smh.com.au