Hoffman with his partner, Mimi O'Donnell, at the 2006 Golden Globes.

Hoffman with his former partner, Mimi O'Donnell, at the 2006 Golden Globes. Photo: Mark J. Terrill/AP

Philip Seymour Hoffman was a hardcore addict, says the man charged with being the actor's drug dealer.

Despite being accused of playing a part in Hoffman's death, Robert Vineberg, also says he could have saved the star.

“He was my friend,” Vineberg, a jazz musician and self-confessed junkie, told The New York Post in an interview from jail on Sunday.

“I could've saved him," he said.

“If I knew he was in town, I would've said, 'Hey, let's make an AA meeting.' If I was with him, it [Hoffman's death] wouldn't have happened. Not under my guard.”

Yet the 57-year-old was arrested last week after an informant claimed to have seen Hoffman scoring drugs from Vineberg's home.

Police subsequently raided Vineberg's apartment and found 300 bags of heroin.

Vineberg was charged with felony drug possession and, according to The Post, is one of three suspected dealers charged in connection with Hoffman.

Vineberg denies that he sold Hoffman the 73 bags of heroin found in his apartment.

In fact he claims that the last time he saw the 46-year-old Capote star was in October last year.

He says the actor, who left behind three children, was high on heroin at the time, but went to rehab after.

Vineberg says the two stayed in touch via email and text message after that time, as they both attempted to get clean.

“He left me a voicemail in December saying, 'I'm clean,'” Vineberg said. “We'd text back and forth, 'Oh, I got one day on you!' 'No I've got one day on you,'”

But then they both relapsed and lost touch.

"He was using needles. He was a hardcore addict,” Vineberg says, claiming that Hoffman had a 10 bag a day habit. "“How much was he found with? Seventy bags. You do the math. That's a one-week supply.”

That amount is twice the amount used by "average" junkies, according to experts.

Vineberg said he was "devastated" by the actor's death.

“When we got together, we talked about books. And art. He was a normal guy. You wouldn't know he was an Oscar winner,” he said.

“He loved his kids. I offer my condolences to his family.”

Fairfax Media