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Lara Bingle photos 'did not look like this'

Model accuses Famous magazine of digitally altering cellulite onto her thighs, and engaging in behaviour that "perpetuates self-doubt in all women".

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Model Lara Bingle has savaged weekly magazine Famous, claiming it digitally altered photos of her on a beach to add cellulite to her thighs.

On Monday night, Bingle tweeted that the latest edition of the magazine had reused older images from its rival Who, which had published the pictures of Bingle on a boat, sans-cellulite, about a month ago.

Posting both images side by side with the caption "Same day. Different magazine" on Twitter, Bingle claimed Famous' actions were "sickening", and perpetuated "self doubt in all women in the name of making a quick buck".

Lara Bingle's post on Twitter, with images from Famous (left) and Who (right).

Lara Bingle's post on Twitter, with images from Famous (left) and Who (right).

Fans supporting Bingle have been tweeting their outrage, with user @lindsay-l0han1 claiming the weekly was "famous for spin, exaggeration and now officially contriving complete lies".

A few hours after the spat started, Famous defended its images, denying they had been altered.

Bingle also attacked the magazine for claiming that she was engaged to Australian actor Sam Worthington within 10 weeks of the couple meeting.

Famous wrote that Worthington "reportedly proposed" to Bingle in Paris. 

"Now, insiders are speculating a wedding is on the cards," the magazine said.

In response to the rumours, Bingle tweeted: "Also, I am not married."

Famous and Who are owned by the same company, Pacific Magazines.

The Butterfly Foundation spokeswoman Jennifer Muir said the organisation was pleased to see ''a celebrity such as Lara realise the role magazines play in manipulating reality and acting as a conduit for celebrity culture''.

''We look forward to Lara and her peers rallying against the use of Photoshop in all circumstances to avoid unrealistic portrayal of men and women by all media,'' she wrote in an email to Fairfax Media.

The foundation believes that the "pervasive use of altered images by the media and fashion industry play a starring role in Australia's increasing rates of low self-esteem and negative body image issues – resulting in skyrocketing rates of eating disorders and self-harm''.

Clique