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Royal baby boy: Kate Middleton, Duchess of Cambridge, delivers future King of England

It's a boy: the official announcement of the birth of the son of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge is posted at the ...
It's a boy: the official announcement of the birth of the son of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge is posted at the gates of Buckingham Palace. Photo: AP
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And that about brings our live coverage to a close.

With night well and truly descended over the Lindo Wing at St Mary's Hospital, London, where the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge are resting with their new baby boy, we aren't expecting too much action until daybreak in Old Blighty.

Hopefully then the world will catch their first glimpse of the new prince and heir to the throne of England.

Hopefully then we'll find out the baby's name.

But all of that will have to wait, at least until after the new mum and dad have finished their breakfast.

Full English?

You bet.

Thanks for your company.

Toodle-pip!

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Meanwhile Clarence House has put together an official social media wrap.

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Time for an update on our baby name poll: George remains the hot favourite, with 50 per cent of the vote.

George is also a favourite with bookies - it's at 6/1 in the US and 2/1 in the UK.

Why? Possibly because the previous Prince of Cambridge was a George. George is also the patron saint of England, and the name of the king of Britain for 116 straight years. Apparently it's of Greek and English origin, and means 'farmer'.

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Here are some interesting facts about this whole #royalbaby business from our Social Media Editor Georgia Waters.

Google Trends is showing there have been more than 2 million searches for 'royal baby' in the US.

 

Twitter has also released information on the #RoyalBaby interest.

  • There have been more than 2 million mentions of the birth on Twitter (that's under the various hashtags, such as #royalbaby, #royalbabyboy, #royalbabywatch etc.
  • Peak in conversation was just after the birth announcement, with 25,000 tweets per minute.
  • #royalbaby hashtag, the most popular tag, has been used more than 900,000 times since the Duchess of Cambridge went into hospital.

And Facebook has been tracking the countries most interested in news of the royal baby.

The top 5 countries 'buzzing' about it are:

  1. UK
  2. US
  3. Canada
  4. Italy
  5. France

Meanwhile the official announcement from the British Monarchy FB page Has 258,000 likes so far.

A trends map released by Facebook showing interest in the royal baby across the world.
A trends map released by Facebook showing interest in the royal baby across the world. 
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While we wait for the Duke and Duchess to emerge from hospital - which could be in the next 12 hours or so - thoughts turn to the kind of environment the young Prince of Cambridge will grow up in. According to the BBC News Magazine, the Duke and Duchess have been making plans for the future king to receive "a thoroughly modern upbringing".

Unlike generations past, the new parents are expected to have a much more hands-on role in the upbringing of their royal progeny. Apparently William and Catherine are determined to rely less on an army of nannies and staffers, and involve their parents more. That will probably wash well with the grandparents. The Middletons - as 'common folk' - will surely know their way around a nappy, while Charles and Diana were famously active in their son's upbringing.

In fact, we're expecting William will emulate his dad's obvious, unstuffy enthusiasm when he finally appears - possibly with his wife by his side and baby in arms - to greet the public with the happy news...

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And now, thoughts on #royalbaby from across the pond:

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A portrait of the previous Prince of Cambridge, George, who was also the 2nd Duke of Cambridge.
A portrait of the previous Prince of Cambridge, George, who was also the 2nd Duke of Cambridge. Photo: Wiki Commons

According to The Guardian, Catherine and William's son is the first to bear the Prince of Cambridge title in nearly 200 years. But mum and dad shouldn't be so keen to have him grow up like his predecessor. The paper has reported the Press Association's characterisation of the previous PoC which depicts him as a man with a "wandering eye" and "daft ideas about promotion within the military".

You can check out the Wiki page for the gentleman in question right here.

Blimey!

Royal watchers have been doing the rounds of morning radio this morning, and the ABC was no exception. According to a guest on Fran Kelly's Radio National show there are two names that the royal baby boy can't have: Oliver or Stephen.

Why?

Apparently no royals can be named Oliver because of that pesky revolution staged by one Oliver Cromwell. Stephen, meanwhile, raises the spectre of the grandson of William the Conquerer who reigned during a period of anarchy in England (from 1135 to 1154).

Thankfully neither of those names are featured in our baby name poll. What's in a name indeed.

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It might have been too late for Australian newspapers, but the royal birth was perfectly timed for front pages of the UK Press:

And our personal favourite:

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So we know that the Duchess of Cambridge will remain in hospital overnight, with her husband and baby by her side. That's quite nice really. Especially when you consider the comfort afforded to guests of the swanky Lindo Wing at St Mary's Hospital.

According to the Daily Mail, the post-natal rooms boast "every conceivable comfort for a mother-to-be", including comfortable recliners for visitors, all your mod-cons, and a dedicated catering staff offering a variety of food options plus a "specially compiled" wine list (Champagne, anyone?).

Apparently the bill for Catherine's overnight stay a suite in the wing could more than £10,000, though  "prices and information available on request and subject to availability."

London delights at the birth of Prince William and the Duchess of Cambridge's son at St. Mary's hospital. Europe correspondent Nick Miller reports.

It's a future king!

London delights at the birth of Prince William and the Duchess of Cambridge's son at St. Mary's hospital. Europe correspondent Nick Miller reports.

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The Australian Republican Movement has made their feelings about the royal baby abundantly clear via a statement issued by National Director David Morris earlier this morning:

"The Australian Republican Movement sends its best wishes to the people of the United Kingdom and to the British royal family on the birth of their future monarch. We look forward to a future day when an Australian Head of State can stand beside the British monarch as friends and equals, cheering for our team just as the British Head of State cheers for the British team, in friendly rivalry.

"Imagine, somewhere in Australia at this moment a future Australian Head of State could be born, who will grow up learning about Australian values such as the fair go and equality, and earn their future role on merit, through hard work and undivided commitment to Australia.

"Our next Head of State could be an Aboriginal Australian, a descendent of the gold rushes or the child of a recent migrant, but only if we complete our national journey by a transition to a republic."

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But what, oh WHAT, will the royal baby look like?

According to a geneticist featured on Sunrise this morning, the baby will probably have brown hair like his mother. However there's a six percent chance the red hair the baby's uncle, Prince Harry, has been blessed with will crop up. The genes behind Kate's green eyes are also more dominant than those responsible for William's blue, apparently, so chances are the heir's peepers will be limpid pools of greenish-blue.

But here's the tallest tale: With William standing a regal 1.91 metres, and Catherine measuring 1.78 metres high, the baby boy could grow to stand 2.04 metres tall!

That's a fair bit bigger than  the tallest British monarch on record, Edward IV, whose skeleton measures 1.94 m...

Who will the new royal baby most resemble? Harry's red hair has a small chance of being passed on, but chances are the ...
Who will the new royal baby most resemble? Harry's red hair has a small chance of being passed on, but chances are the baby boy will look most like Kate, geneticists say. Photo: AFP
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Prince William was born June 21, 1982. His son was born July 22, 2013. So, by our calculations, the young Prince of Cambridge is a Cancer - just like his dad.

Here's their horoscope for the day, according to resident Fairfax astrologer Kelli Fox:

"You may have to deal with the public in some way today. This might mean speaking to a group at work, or making phone calls about a certain matter or cause. No matter how much you love people or believe in your project, this kind of work can wear you out. It takes a lot out of you to interact with so many people! Be sure to build in relaxation time, or get to bed early."

Charles, Prince of Wales, and then-wife, Princess Diana, take home their newborn son Prince William who was born at St ...
Charles, Prince of Wales, and then-wife, Princess Diana, take home their newborn son Prince William who was born at St Mary's Hospital on June 21, 1982. Photo: John Redman
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And here's the scoop from the desk of Prime Minister Kevin Rudd:

"On behalf of all Australians, Therese and I extend our warmest regards to the new parents, Prince William, Duke of Cambridge and Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge. Prince William holds a special place in the hearts of many Australians. Some of us remember his first visit to this country as a 9 month old baby more than 30 years ago with his mother Diana and father Charles.

"In more recent times, Prince William demonstrated deep compassion when he met with families in Victoria who had lost everything during the Black Saturday bushfires of February 2009. We share in the joy of the Royal Family, particularly Prince Charles on the birth of his grandson and Queen Elizabeth II on the birth of her great grandchild. This is a happy day for our close friends in Britain and the Commonwealth."

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This just in from the Leader of the Opposition Tony Abbott:

"Margie and I join all Australians in extending to the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge congratulations and best wishes on the birth of their son. This would be the happiest day in their lives and all Australians share their joy. While there will come a time to contemplate the constitutional duties that await the young Prince, today we simply welcome a baby boy into the world and share the joy of this young family. I am sure that over the course of his life, the Prince will, like the rest of his family, develop a deep affection for our country, as we already have for him."

RAW VIDEO: British Prime Minister David Cameron congratulates Prince William and his wife Kate on the birth of their baby boy.

British PM says Commonwealth will celebrate

The British PM David Cameron emerges from 10 Downing Street to congratulate the royal couple on the birth of their baby boy.

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We're hearing that new dad Prince William won't come out to say g'day to the media scrum or crowds of subjects, opting to stay inside the hospital with his wife, Catherine, and new baby boy... But the BBC has Tweeted a quote from the Duke: "We could not be happier", he's said to have said...

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Just to recap: Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge "has been delivered" of a baby boy. He is about 3.8 kilograms large (8lbs 6oz), and he arrived at 4.24 pm London time. He'll be the Prince of Cambrige, but we don't yet know what his first name will be. Clarence House has said mother and baby are doing well, and will remain at the Lido Wing of St Mary's Hospital overnight. We're yet to hear from the Queen, or new dad Prince William, however grand-dad Prince Charles of Wales is officially "proud and happy".

Tony Appleton, a town crier,  announces the birth of the royal baby, outside St. Mary's Hospital.
Tony Appleton, a town crier, announces the birth of the royal baby, outside St. Mary's Hospital. Photo: Lefteris Pitarakis
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