JavaScript disabled. Please enable JavaScript to use My News, My Clippings, My Comments and user settings.

If you have trouble accessing our login form below, you can go to our login page.

If you have trouble accessing our login form below, you can go to our login page.

The 10 recipes everyone should know

Date

Jill Dupleix

Jill Dupleix nominates 10 dishes to take you through life. "If you can cook these recipes well, you can cook anything,'' she says.

Video settings

Please Log in to update your video settings

Video will begin in 5 seconds.

Video settings

Please Log in to update your video settings

Ma po beancurd

Jill Dupleix's take on Ma po beancurd

PT0M0S 620 349

These 10 recipes could change your life - for the better. They'll give you confidence in the kitchen and comfort at the table. They'll help you win friends and influence people. Who needs social-media hashtags when you can make the perfect #tartetatin?

We're not talking about one-night-only showoff cooking, such as whipping up Peter Gilmore's snow egg dessert, or Tetsuya Wakuda's perfect confit of ocean trout. We're talking about recipes we should all know inside-out and upside-down, recipes our mothers should have taught us, and we should teach our children, and our partners. These are the mother recipes, the ones you want to cook time and again, the ones that pass on the skills, techniques and accumulated instinct that are the foundation of all good cooking.

Take the omelet. Everyone knows how to make an omelet, right? But the perfect omelet? That takes time - and a helpful recipe.

Great roast chicken.
 Photo: Marina Oliphant. Food styling and preparation by Caroline Velik. Click for more photos

Ten recipes to change your life

Jill Dupleix nominates 10 recipes to take you through life. 'If you can cook these recipes well, you can cook anything', she says.


Photos by Marina Oliphant. Food styling and preparation by Caroline Velik
 

I've learnt from the best chefs and country home cooks and I've picked up a couple of tricks along the way. So although the recipes here are mine, I share them with a long line of wonderfully skilled and generous teachers from around the world. Each recipe comes with a tip from one of the greats - the sort of wise or helpful thing they might say if they were standing next to you in the kitchen.

If you can cook these recipes well, you can cook anything.

Ma po beancurd

Minestrone soup

A great roast chicken

Creamy potato gratin

The classic omelet

Tarte tartin

Salt and pepper squid

Osso buco

Molten chocolate pudding

The perfect risotto

 

What do you think of the list? Is there a classic dish in your repertoire that you would add?

Follow Cuisine on Twitter @Cuisine

121 comments so far

  • This list is very Anglo people ;( I think we need to add the following:

    A RED OR GREEN THAI CURRY
    From the ground up. No jars.

    Understanding how these flavours work will truly teach you how to balance hot, sour, salty, sweet elements correctly.

    AN INDIAN CURRY
    You are not a modern home cook unless you know how to dry roast and temper spices; how to make a curry paste. The spices in Indian food open you up to the flavours of the whole world.

    Once again, no jars of goop.

    CUSTARD
    Come on!! If you can make a custard by hand, you can make a gazillion classic sweets across many cuisine.

    A custard can be Italian or Thai, can be icecream or lemon curd tart.

    Commenter
    eat me
    Date and time
    July 10, 2012, 8:55AM
    • Good call on the 3 additions. I'll be teaaching my daughter a classic tomato based pasta sauce as well.

      Commenter
      BBS
      Location
      Melbourne
      Date and time
      July 10, 2012, 9:43AM
    • Absolutely! How to cook out the onions correctly, treat the tomatoes correctly. Once you understand how caramelisation of veg brings out innate sweetness, a whole world opens up.

      And it's really really easy!

      Commenter
      eat me
      Date and time
      July 10, 2012, 10:12AM
    • totally agree! When I saw this list I thought "hold on, there's so many cuisines that have been overlooked!". And yes, cooking curries (whether thai or indian etc) must be done from scratch to truly understand the marriage of flavours :)

      Commenter
      Archie
      Date and time
      July 10, 2012, 10:22AM
    • Red or Green Curry and Indian. Well you can't really get more 'Anglo' than that can you. The classic got to for white people when they think they are being adventurous. Why not just add Sweet and Sour Pork to your list

      Commenter
      Sam
      Location
      Bangkok
      Date and time
      July 10, 2012, 10:39AM
    • Racist much Sam? These are BASIC dishes, that's the idea...

      Commenter
      Jaime
      Location
      Sydney
      Date and time
      July 10, 2012, 11:10AM
    • Eat me, this list is actually not Anglo at all... granted the roast and the pudding may be typically Anglo but the rest of the dishes are made up of Asian, traditional French and traditional Italian dishes.

      Sam in Bangkok, I totally agree with you. What about South American, Spanish and African cuisines, what about tagines?

      Commenter
      Adalina
      Location
      Beautiful South Western Sydney
      Date and time
      July 10, 2012, 11:12AM
    • Sam, that's really rude, and it misses the point. If you learn how to balance sweet, hot, salt and sour by mastering Thai curries, then you'll make a better gaeng khanoon or nam phrik ong or whatever, if you have a mind to. And if you perfect the technique of dry roasting and mixing spices,by practicing your palak paneer until it's perfect, then the whole world of Indian, Sri Lankan, Middle Eastern and North African cuisine is less daunting.

      Commenter
      vian
      Date and time
      July 10, 2012, 11:15AM
    • Custard powder isn't so bad, and I much prefer it over pre-packaged custard.

      Commenter
      Katana Geldar
      Location
      Ryde
      Date and time
      July 10, 2012, 11:22AM
    • Sam, how can you rule out all Indian curries as 'Anglo'? If you are just refering to butter chicken then yes that is very westernised but there are plenty of other Indian curries.

      If you can master the art of working with spices it opens up a huge range of dishes which you can prepare across a range of different cuisines by tweaking quantities, mixes and methods.

      Commenter
      TJ
      Date and time
      July 10, 2012, 11:33AM

More comments

Make a comment

You are logged in as [Logout]

All information entered below may be published.

Error: Please enter your screen name.

Error: Your Screen Name must be less than 255 characters.

Error: Your Location must be less than 255 characters.

Error: Please enter your comment.

Error: Your Message must be less than 300 words.

Post to

You need to have read and accepted the Conditions of Use.

Thank you

Your comment has been submitted for approval.

Comments are moderated and are generally published if they are on-topic and not abusive.

Featured advertisers

Horoscopes

Capricorn horoscope

Trust others to think for themselves. Don't be snobbish about what seems obvious. Everyone learns at their own pace, including you.

...find out more here