Queensland suffered the biggest loss of jobs in the country last month.

Queensland suffered the biggest loss of jobs in the country last month.

Queensland's unemployment rate continues to rise, reaching its highest level since June 2003.

The latest statistics from the Australian Bureau of Statistics showed Queensland's seasonally adjusted rate increased from 6.3 per cent in June to 6.8 per cent in July.

Trend figures, the raw data government's prefer to rely on, also increased much more marginally from 6.4 per cent in June to 6.5 per cent in July.

But Queensland's result was in line with the nation and other states.

Nationally, the seasonally adjusted rate was up .03 percentage points to 6.4 per cent - its highest point since August 2002.

The economy lost 300 jobs in July: While 14,500 full-time positions were added, 14,800 part-time jobs disappeared.

The participation rate edged 0.1 per cent higher to 64.8 per cent, which does not explain to jump in the headline unemployment rate.

Queensland suffered the biggest loss of jobs in July, with unemployment in the state jumping from 6.2 per cent to 6.8 per cent. New South Wales' unemployment rose from 5.7 per cent to 5.9 per cent.

Victoria's unemployment lifted 0.4 percentage points to 7 per cent, Tasmania jumped from 7.3 per cent to 7.6 per cent and Western Australia's jobless rate inched higher to 5.2 per cent.

Only South Australia bucked the trend, with its rate dropping from 7.3 to 7.2 per cent.

The LNP promised to drop unemployment to 4 per cent over six years during the 2012 election campaign.

Treasurer Tim Nicholls has since admitted that figure is a "stretch target".

Opposition Treasury spokesman Curtis Pitt said the government was breaking its promise. 

“The data shows 12,600 were jobs lost in July. Of these job losses, 12,000 were full-time. There are now 14,200 fewer full-time jobs than when the LNP was elected in March 2012," he said in a statement.

“The participation rate has also decreased to 66.2 per cent, which means more people are giving up looking for work. 

“The unemployment rate was 5.5 per cent when the Newman Government was elected. They promised to lower it to 4 per cent. In July it was 6.8 per cent.''

- with Max Mason