Sport

ACT Premier Cricket: West Indian fast bowler Alrick Campbell makes his mark with ANU

ANU fast bowler Alrick Campbell initially thought Australia was too far away from his home in the West Indies to contemplate coming here to study.

But combining his passion of helping to lower electricity prices in his home country with his love of cricket has made his three-year stay in Canberra worthwhile.

Speedster: West Indian fast bowler Alrick Campbell is the leading wicket-taker for ANU this season.
Speedster: West Indian fast bowler Alrick Campbell is the leading wicket-taker for ANU this season. Photo: Rohan Thomson

Campbell is ANU's leading wicket-taker in the ACT Premier Cricket first-grade competition this season with 22 wickets from 13 games.

He arrived in Canberra at the start of 2013 after receiving an Australian Government scholarship to complete a PhD in Economics at ANU.

Having studied at the University of the West Indies in Jamaica, Campbell and his wife were looking at opportunities in the US before a friend suggested they look into coming to Australia.

"It's been a fantastic experience so far," Campbell said.

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"I want to work in the electricity industry because one of the challenges for Jamaica is we have some of the highest electricity prices in the world.

"The reason for that is because we have to import oil to generate electricity, it's very inefficient and out-dated and we have regulation issues related to the industry itself.

"Those are things I want to look at closer to get the electricity sector to operate more efficiently."

Campbell got a glimpse of a couple of future West Indies stars when he was growing up, playing against fast bowler Jerome Taylor and batsman Marlon Samuels.

"Seeing [Taylor] bowl he was really quick, you could see he was above that standard of cricket," Campbell said.

"It was the same with Marlon Samuels. The first time I saw him play a cover drive, nobody moved.

"It's the best I've ever seen at that level."

Campbell continued his impressive summer last weekend taking 4-95 for ANU in Tuggeranong's imposing first innings total of 348 at Chisholm Oval.

But he believes the pitches in Australia are too flat and need to have more in them for the bowlers.

"You can see these guys can bat, but you're not really sure how good they are because of the pitches we play on," he said.

"It doesn't give bowlers enough confidence to intimidate and it's too predictable.

"Until the quality of the pitches improve, that's when you'll see the real talent of these cricketers coming out."

All focus will be on Kippax Oval as Queanbeyan attempt to sneak into the finals.

Queanbeyan are chasing quick wickets with last-placed Ginninderra 40 runs behind and 2-31 in their second innings.

An outright victory would move Queanbeyan up to 24 points and leave either North Canberra Gungahlin (24) or Eastlake (22) in danger of missing out.

Eastlake have first-innings points and will resume on 5-132 after bowling Norths out for 131.

If Queanbeyan win outright and Norths lose, quotient will decide which team grabs fourth spot and faces minor premiers Wests/UC in the semi-finals.

SATURDAY: Douglas Cup: Wests/UC 186 v Weston Creek Molonglo 3-214 at Stirling Oval. Ginninderra 86 and 2-31 v Queanbeyan 6-157 (dec) at Kippax No 1 Oval. North Canberra Gungahlin 131 v Eastlake 5-132 at Kingston Oval. Tuggeranong 348 v ANU at Chisholm No 1 Oval. Play starts at 11am.