Sport

London Olympic Games near miss inspires Canberra boxer to fulfill professional dream

 One lousy point was all that stopped Canberra super middleweight boxer Dave Toussaint from fulfilling his Olympic Games dream.

Toussaint doesn't blame the judges or feel short-changed or hold a grudge with Jesse Ross for securing the place on the Australian team to London in 2012.

Canberra boxer Dave Toussaint ready for his fight on Saturday night.
Canberra boxer Dave Toussaint ready for his fight on Saturday night. Photo: Jay Cronan

Instead, he uses it as motivation.

When Toussaint steps into the ring against Steve Moxon at the Hellenic Club on Saturday night, he will be aiming to build on an unbeaten streak that is three years long and counting.

Toussaint is on a hot streak since the Olympic qualifiers in 2012, winning every fight he has taken in the amateur ranks and through his first six bouts as a professional.

But it hasn't been easy, taking six months out of the sport after his Olympic dream ended before realising he had more he wanted to achieve.

"It definitely shattered me, you put in all the hard yards to get there and when you don't do it ... I had a bit of time off afterwards to reset," Toussaint said.

"I didn't just want to give up, I had a bit of talent so I decided to turn my hands to the pros and set some new goals.

"I've been doing it since I was eight years old so it'd be a shame to throw it away."

Boxing is in the 23-year-old's blood.

His grandfather was a boxer, so was his dad, Dean, and his older brother had a few kickboxing and boxing bouts.

Dean is now a boxing coach at the Hills Sports Academy in Belconnen and is in Dave's corner for every fight.

Dave had his first competitive bout at 12.

The family moved to Canberra when he was 15 as he continued to hone his craft.

"Dad was doing a juniors class at the PCYC in Lismore and we would climb up and look through the window," Toussaint said.

"I was playing footy and boxing from when I was eight to under-14s.

"As I was cutting down weight for boxing and the other guys were putting on weight for footy, it was getting hard to juggle both."

It's the same for balancing his boxing training and life as an electrician.

"It doesn't leave a lot of times for fun and games, that's for sure," Toussaint said.

"Getting up at 4.30 in the morning to get to the gym at 5am, then training from 5am-6.30am, quickly start work at 7am, having breakfast in your car, slaving away at work all day then back in the gym for 4.30pm training.

"Come Thursday and Friday, you're absolutely wrecked, but I guess you have to put in the work to reap the rewards.

"I'm working towards going boxing full-time down the track so I can give it a red-hot crack while I've got the potential to do it."

SATURDAY: Capital Fight Show at the Hellenic Club, Woden. Doors open at 6pm, first fight at 7pm. Tickets available from the Hellenic Club.