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Canberra's top 10 sport stories: Nick Kyrgios finishes top of the pops

It was the sledge that echoed around the world and possibly earned world No.30 Nick Kyrgios the moniker "bad boy" for the rest of his career.

It was also the four words that eventually led to the 20-year-old getting dropped from Australia's Davis Cup team for the semi-final against Great Britain.

Not surprisingly, reigning French Open champion Stan Wawrinka took exception when Kyrgios said, "Kokkinakis banged your girlfriend", during their second-round clash at the Rogers Cup in Montreal in August.

Social media went into a meltdown as Kyrgios' comment was widely condemned across the planet.

The Association of Tennis Professionals gave Kyrgios a suspended sentence of a $25,000 fine and a 28-day suspension, which could be avoided through good behaviour over a six-month period.

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In the aftermath of Kyrgios' comments, Aussie Davis Cup captain Wally Masur decided to drop his fellow Canberran for the tie in Glasgow.

Kyrgios was able to go some way to smoking the peace pipe when he teamed up with Wawrinka for the Singapore Slammers in the International Premier Tennis League in India.

Now it's "like nothing happened".

Dawn Fraser directs racist comments at Kyrgios

Dawn Fraser made a racist comment about Nick Kyrgios on national television.

Dawn Fraser made a racist comment about Nick Kyrgios on national television.

Kyrgios found himself at the centre of a race row when four-time Olympic gold medallist Dawn Fraser said the Canberra tennis star and Bernard Tomic should "go back to where their fathers or parents came from" on breakfast television.

Fraser stood by her comments when Fairfax Media contacted her, but was later forced to apologise after a furore erupted.

Kyrgios took aim at Fraser on Facebook: "Throwing a racket, brat. Debating the rules, disrespectful. Frustrated when competing, spoilt. Showing emotion, arrogant. Blatant racist, Australian legend."

Fraser made her comments in the wake of claims Kyrgios tanked during his fourth-round loss to Richard Gasquet at Wimbledon in July.

Jacques' potty mouth unleashes homophobic slurs on Brumbies

Brumbies flanker David Pocock reported Waratahs flanker Jacques Potgieter for using homophobic slurs.

Brumbies flanker David Pocock reported Waratahs flanker Jacques Potgieter for using homophobic slurs. Photo: Matt Bedford

From sexual harassment to racism to homophobia, the 2015 war of words continued when NSW Waratahs back-rower Jacques Potgieter decided it was his turn to open his big mouth.

Potgieter called two ACT Brumbies players "faggot" in the Super Rugby derby at Allianz Stadium in March and he was fined $20,000 – $10,000 of which was suspended.

Wallabies World Cup hero David Pocock brought the homophobic comments to referee Craig Joubert's attention and then Brumbies and Wallabies captain Stephen Moore backed Pocock up.

Bizarrely, Pocock was criticised for taking a stand against language that society no longer deems acceptable.

Apparently he was grandstanding, using his sporting profile as a political soapbox and, even worse, guilty of the heinous crime of breaking the code of "what's said on the field stays on the field" – even though he actually made his complaints on the field and the only reason they left there was because of Joubert's microphone.

No Moore Wallabies captain at Brumbies HQ

Wallabies captain Stephen Moore will join the Queensland Reds in 2017.

Wallabies captain Stephen Moore will join the Queensland Reds in 2017. Photo: Dan Mullan

Just when the Brumbies thought a bad week couldn't get any worse, their captain Stephen Moore decided to accept a three-year contract to stay in Australian Super Rugby until the 2019 World Cup.

Unfortunately, that contract was with Brumbies' rivals Queensland Reds.

The loss of Moore, who helped transform a fractured Wallabies unit into World Cup finalists in the space of 12 months, came on the back of a rough week in the press for the Brumbies.

There were reports of a rift between the Brumbies and their University of Canberra landlords and the announcement of a record $1.6 million loss.

Star playmaker Matt Toomua had already announced he was leaving at the end of 2016 to join English club Leicester.

The Brumbies are hoping the loss of Moore will help them keep a number of other stars who are off contract at the end of 2016, such as Christian Lealiifano and David Pocock, after leaving room in the salary cap.

Ricky Stuart gives media the silent treatment

Canberra Raiders coach Ricky Stuart was fined $15,000 for ending a press conference early.

Canberra Raiders coach Ricky Stuart was fined $15,000 for ending a press conference early. Photo: Jay Cronan

Canberra Raiders coach Ricky Stuart took just 25 seconds and 68 words for his post-match press conference following the Raiders' 24-12 loss to the Brisbane Broncos at Canberra Stadium in May.

He was initially fined a whopping $20,000 for breaching media guidelines, although that was reduced to $15,000 on appeal.

It took his coaching career tally for fines to $120,000.

The press conference started with Stuart asked: "Ricky it was just one of those games ..."

"No it wasn't one of those games mate. [NRL head of football] Toddy Greenberg, he was at the game tonight and I just really hope he saw what I saw," Stuart said.

"It's a lot healthier for our club if we don't go any further into this press conference. I have respect for all the media, it's got nothing to do with you, but it's just a lot healthier if I don't continue. Thanks."

Socceroos' success ends with A-League hopes dashed

Tim Cahill and Mile Jedinak celebrate a Socceroos goal at Canberra Stadium.

Tim Cahill and Mile Jedinak celebrate a Socceroos goal at Canberra Stadium. Photo: Getty-Images

No sooner had the mud settled from the Socceroos' thumping of Kyrgyzstan and Football Federation Australia boss David Gallop was ending Canberra's hopes of getting an A-League club.

The Socceroos spent the week leading up to the game building bridges with a Canberra public that felt the FFA had let them down in the past, only for coach Ange Postecoglou to blast the Canberra Stadium surface.

But more than 19,000 fans turned up despite the torrential rain that battered Canberra Stadium just hours before kick-off.

It was a demonstration of Canberra's desire for more quality soccer, with the nation's capital getting its own A-League team the clear goal.

But two weeks later, Gallop kiboshed any hope of that in the foreseeable future with only cities with populations in the millions being considered.

It did open the way for A-League clubs to bring games to Canberra, with the Central Coast Mariners investigating the possibility of returning to Canberra Stadium – a move backed by former Mariners manager and current Gosford mayor Lawrie McKinna.

World Cup Gayle blows Zimbabwe away

Master blaster Chris Gayle created history with his World Cup knock at Manuka Oval.

Master blaster Chris Gayle created history with his World Cup knock at Manuka Oval. Photo: Melissa Adams

Modern day master blaster Chris Gayle made Manuka Oval his own with one of the most brutal World Cup innings ever seen.

The Windies team currently in Australia might be a shell of their past, but the 5544 people in the crowd witnessed everything that was great about the Calypso Kings.

Gayle's 215 came off just 147 balls – with his second hundred taking just 33 deliveries.

At the time it was the highest ever World Cup innings – only for Kiwi Martin Guptill to break it later in the tournament – the fastest ever one-day international double century, the most sixes in a World Cup innings and was part of the highest ever ODI partnerships.

Just a shame he's not in the Test team.

Iran sees red as Iraq claim Asian Cup quarter-final upset

Referee Ben Williams sends Mehrdad Pooladi off in the Asian Cup quarter-final between Iran and Iraq at Canberra Stadium.

Referee Ben Williams sends Mehrdad Pooladi off in the Asian Cup quarter-final between Iran and Iraq at Canberra Stadium.

It's safe to say Iran weren't happy to lose with arch-rivals Iraq.

They lodged an appeal claiming Iraq had fielded an ineligible player after they were knocked out of the Asian Cup in a penalty shootout.

Iran also had a player sent off in the first half of the sold-out quarter-final at Canberra Stadium in January.

Their coach, Carlos Queiroz, was furious with Canberra referee Ben Williams' decision to send off defender Mehrdad Pooladi and had to be physically restrained at half-time.

The thrilling final came just days after Canberra Stadium was declared the best surface in the Asian Cup.

Manuka Oval in for the long haul

Manuka Oval.

Manuka Oval could host a Test match soon. Photo: Jay Cronan

Slowly but surely, Canberra is closing in on a historic first Test match, thanks largely to Tasmanians and their apparent dislike for the longest format of the game.

Reports emerged less than 10,000 could turn up to the first four days of the Hobart Test between Australia and the West Indies, opening the door for Manuka Oval to take Bellerive's spot in the Test match pecking order.

In the end 15,343 came for the three days' play – albeit boosted by thousands of free tickets for school kids.

Next summer there'll be six Tests – three against South Africa and three against Pakistan – leaving one that would normally be held in Hobart up for grabs.

Cricket Australia director Tony Harrison, the former Cricket Tasmania chairman, tried to turn it into a class war, labelling it as Canberran "fat-cat bureaucrats" up against "the workers of Tasmania".

Home unsweet home

Jack Wighton of the Raiders reacts after the Sharks score at Canberra Stadium.

Jack Wighton of the Raiders reacts after the Sharks score at Canberra Stadium. Photo: Stefan Postles

Canberra Stadium became a fortress in 2015 – unfortunately it was for the visiting sides playing the Canberra Raiders.

The Raiders had three wins from 12 home games, their worst home record in their 34-year history – even worse than when they won their only wooden spoon in 1982.

Seven of those defeats were by a point or less, including a Johnathan Thurston match-winning field goal and a Brett Stewart late try that shouldn't have been allowed.

But there's a feeling of optimism around the club, signalled by their re-signing of coach Ricky Stuart until the end of 2018.

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