Brad Haddin helps Canberra Grammar students during a Milo Cricket training session.

Brad Haddin helps Canberra Grammar students during a Milo Cricket training session. Photo: Colleen Petch

Three centuries in as many Sheffield Shield games would put Brad Haddin in pretty esteemed company.

The Australian and NSW veteran returns to his old stomping ground eager to continue his purple patch with the bat when the Blues host Queensland at Manuka Oval, starting on Tuesday.

Having grown up in Queanbeyan and represented the Canberra Comets in the national limited-overs competition, the 35-year-old wicketkeeper has shown no sign of slowing down since he was dropped from the Test team in favour of Matthew Wade.

Brad Haddin has a run with Canberra Grammar students.

Brad Haddin has a run with Canberra Grammar students. Photo: Colleen Petch

Haddin made 114 in the Sheffield Shield match against Tasmania in September, and followed it up with an unbeaten 108 against Victoria earlier this month.

In between, he captained the Sydney Sixers to victory in the lucrative $2.5 million Champions League Twenty20 tournament in South Africa.

Haddin said his red-hot batting form was the result of a relaxed attitude at the crease and not being concerned with proving anything to national selectors.

Brad Haddin has a run with Canberra Grammar students.

Brad Haddin has a run with Canberra Grammar students. Photo: Colleen Petch

''I think it's just I've had the opportunity to do some work during the off-season,'' he said.

''I don't think too much has changed over the last few years.

''I'm just enjoying playing with the freedom I've had in the last few games.

Brad Haddin gives some bowling tips.

Brad Haddin gives some bowling tips. Photo: Colleen Petch

''But it all counts for nothing if we can't get some points together.''

The Blues have won just one of their four games this season to languish in fifth on the table and desperately need the six points before the competition breaks for the Big Bash League.

It's Haddin's first game in Canberra since his days with the Comets.

He captained the Prime Minister's XI in this year's match with Sri Lanka, only for the game to be washed out without a ball being bowled.

The shield match and Sunday's Ryobi Cup one-day game between the two states open an exceptional summer of cricket in the ACT.

The highlight will be the inaugural visit by the Australian cricket team when it takes on the West Indies in a one-day match under lights at Manuka in February.

There is also a Chairman's XI game against Sri Lanka in December, and the annual Prime Minister's XI fixture against the Windies in January.

''I think the one-dayer here is a great coup for Canberra cricket, especially with the lights coming in now,'' Haddin said.

''Just to have the likes of Chris Gayle, Michael Clarke and Shane Watson playing in an international in Canberra.

''I think it's great for the region and great to come out and see some international cricketers in Canberra.''