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Mark Waugh says one-day internationals still have plenty to offer

As good as it gets:  James Faulkner celebrates Australia's stunning ODI win against England on Friday.

As good as it gets: James Faulkner celebrates Australia's stunning ODI win against England on Friday. Photo: Getty Images

Mark Waugh believes there remains a future for one-day internationals, despite the slide of the once-golden format of the game amid the boom of Twenty20 cricket.

Waugh said the Twenty20 game was here to stay but said next year's World Cup, to be held in Australia and New Zealand, would be a litmus test for the 50-over format, which though no longer a box-office still attracts strong TV ratings.

What we saw in Brisbane the other night if you don't like that sort of cricket you're hard to please. 

"The Australians, the way they're playing, it will revitalise one-day cricket, it's been on a bit of a downward spiral," said Waugh, who will on Monday be inducted into the Australian Cricket Hall of Fame, as will former national captain Belinda Clark.

"What we saw in Brisbane the other night if you don't like that sort of cricket you're hard to please.

"I think this World Cup's going to be important with 50-over cricket – just to see where it sits in the three levels of cricket.

"I'm sure if the captains play attacking cricket and it's in the right spirit it should be good."

Waugh was happy with the current balance between the two limited-over forms. Australia and England are playing a best-of-five ODI series followed by three Twenty20s to round out the Ashes summer.

"There's room for all three [forms], there definitely is," Waugh said. "You've just got to be careful with the schedule there's not too much 50-over or Twenty20 cricket. I'm sure CA are working on that and getting the right balance.

"If there's too much of something and the same team plays each other seven or eight times in a row, that does get boring. The balance is pretty good at the moment.

"I think T20 cricket is here to stay. It's entertaining and it's short, there's a certain set of skils in it. It's evolving as a game and tactics as well. It's definitely going to be popular for a long time."

Clark, who will be the first woman inducted into the hall of fame, said Cricket Australia was looking at the possible introduction of a female Big Bash League as it conducts a review of the domestic women's game.

Although no recommendations have yet been put forward, Clark did not discount the chance of the women playing curtain-raisers to the men's.

Clark holds the record for most ODI runs scored by an Australian woman and is also the manager of CA's Centre of Excellence.

1 comment so far

  • It may only have been created in 1975, but ODI's are part of cricket folklore now. We can't just "get rid of it". T20 started in 2003 (or thereabouts) and this slash and bash form of the game appeals to the masses, but it's got no history, only money - lots of it, mainly in BCCI land.

    Give me the 50 over game any day over T20s.

    Commenter
    Brumbies2014
    Location
    Sydney
    Date and time
    January 20, 2014, 6:53AM

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