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New Zealand v Australia: Five things we learnt from the first Test

The cult of Voges

By this point, we should all have established that Voges, the mild-mannered man from the West, is in fact not Donald Bradman. For a brief moment over the weekend, his average surged past that of the iconic one, keeping cricket writers and broadcasters busy in the midst of a dominant Australian performance.

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After a superb 239 (his second double century in three innings) Voges now has a Test average of 97.46. We all know that can only head one direction in the long-term but at the ripe age of 36, Voges has established himself as a world-class bat and another one of Australia's late, great Test bloomers.

A job well done: Steve Smith (left) and his team-matesare one match away from regaining the No.1 ranking.

A job well done: Steve Smith (left) and his team-mates are one match away from regaining the No.1 ranking. Photo: Getty Images

Top of the pops

Given the way Australia so clinically demolished their hosts in Wellington, there's every chance that being number one in the world means more to the players than they tend to give away. Australia need only a draw in the second Test in Christchurch to regain the highest slot on the ICC rankings.

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Given the manner of victory this week, it would take a brave punter to suggest the tables could be sufficiently turned. India are currently one point ahead but another strong performance will have Steve Smith and the Australians back where they feel they belong.

Living up to the hype: Usman Khawaja is delivering in his promise.

Living up to the hype: Usman Khawaja is delivering in his promise. Photo: Getty Images

Worth the wait

Usman Khawaja is on the way to becoming the special kind of batsman many thought he could be. The elegant stroke-player has had injury and form setbacks throughout his career - as have many of Australia's best blades - but now looks not only settled and assured at number three, but downright commanding.

In his past five matches, he has compiled 644 runs at 128.8 and handled the swing and movement in Wellington with ease, hopefully pointing to similar success in England. He may be just the man Australia needs to build a resilience to the moving ball. Best of all, it's just pretty to watch.

Reprieve: Kiwi paceman Doug Bracewell was ruled to have overstepped his mark.

Reprieve: Kiwi paceman Doug Bracewell was ruled to have overstepped his mark. Photo: Fox Sports

Technology can't fix everything

Everybody felt for the Kiwis after Voges was bowled when he was just seven by Doug Bracewell, only for it to be incorrectly ruled a no-ball by umpire Richard Illingworth. He would, of course, go on to notch a handy double century in an incident that Black Caps bowling coach Dimitri Mascarenhas said "knocked the stuffing" out of the home side.

For all of the advances in cricket technology to ensure correct decisions, this looks to be one area where the current array of gadgets are unable to assist. Even in the fraction of a second a batsman has to respond to a delivery, there is no telling what reaction he may have when he hears and sees evidence of a no-ball. The best a video review could do is simply give the bowler another delivery. 

Rare piece of good news: Henry Nicholls impressed for the Black Caps.

Rare piece of good news: Henry Nicholls impressed for the Black Caps. Photo: Getty Images

The Black Caps need to show up

This was the first Test defeat for New Zealand on home soil since 2012 but the manner of the loss should ring some alarm bells for a cricket nation with higher ambitions. The result ended a 13-match unbeaten streak at home for New Zealand and continued their struggles against an Australian side over-flowing with confidence.

They were guilty of wasting starts, with Martin Guptill a repeat offender, although a fighting second innings 59 from debutant Henry Nicholls was one ember of positivity. They will hope to win the toss in Christchurch and for conditions that assist Trent Boult and Tim Southee. But they must find a way to take wickets when the swing they crave doesn't eventuate.

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