Sport

Sheffield Shield: Pink ball with facelift back for seventh round

The most talked about 156-gram object of the summer is back, but this time the pink ball has had a facelift.

The new black seem shouldn't affect the way it plays but rather make it easier for batsmen to see in the seventh round of the Sheffield Shield, beginning Sunday.

Pink balls old and new: New (right) has black stitching instead of green and white (left)
Pink balls old and new: New (right) has black stitching instead of green and white (left)  Photo: Kookaburra

"Speaking to a lot of the batters, it seems to be the biggest reservation for the guys is picking up the seam," NSW allrounder Stephen O'Keefe says.

The Blues travel to Western Australia, where O'Keefe will be looking to add to the 18 wickets he has taken in three day-night Shield matches, all of which have been at the Adelaide Oval.

"It's certainly going to be different conditions in Perth, I expect it to be more pace-friendly." he said.

A return fixture from last week's draw in New Zealand between the two sides, it is likely to be the highest scoring compared to the greener pitches which will be used to protect the ball at the Gabba and Adelaide.

Advertisement

A Test match wicket will be used at the Gabba, however visiting Tasmania coach Dan Marsh doesn't expect to see the first-day-of-the-summer type runs fans have become used to.

"The expectation of teams scoring 500-plus is not going to be there if they keep producing the wickets they are," he said.

"I think we just have to embrace the pink ball, we've got white-ball cricket, red-ball cricket and now pink-ball cricket and it's a different game."

The match is a vital one for Queensland against the bottom-of-the-ladder Tigers, with the Bulls, led by Chris Hartley, currently less than one point outside the top two.

"It's a lot easier if you can be leading the competition or driving the competition rather than chasing points at the back end," Hartley told AAP.

"It means that you've got more options throughout the games that you play.

"If you're behind on the points table then you've really got to throw caution to the wind with the style of play."

Meanwhile, the likes of short-form specialist Glenn Maxwell will be challenged by a similarly green Adelaide Oval pitch to the one that was used for the day-night Test against New Zealand in November.

"I'm looking forward to putting my name up in lights for long-form cricket," Maxwell said ahead of the top-of-the-table clash with South Australia.

"It's something that I haven't shied away from, being my main goal at some stage to get back in that Baggy Green," he said.

"It's only going to come with consistent performances, and I've been made aware of that."

AAP