Proven performer: NSW and Sydney Sixers coach Trevor Bayliss.

Proven performer: NSW and Sydney Sixers coach Trevor Bayliss. Photo: Getty Images

CHITTAGONG: Australian Trevor Bayliss will be one of four candidates interviewed for the position of England's new head coach after Ashley Giles's audition for the role ended with a humiliating 45-run defeat by minnows Holland at the World Twenty20.

England's dismal winter sank to a fresh nadir on Monday when they were skittled for 88 by a Dutch bowling attack led by Mudassar Bukhari, a former assistant manager of Burger King at Amsterdam Schiphol airport.

It was an acutely embarrassing defeat for Giles in the final match before the England and Wales Cricket Board begins interviewing potential successors to Andy Flower, who resigned as head coach after the Ashes whitewash.

Coach Ashley Giles trudges off after England's humiliating loss to the Netherlands.

Coach Ashley Giles trudges off after England's humiliating loss to the Netherlands. Photo: Getty Images

Giles will still be interviewed over the next fortnight, as will Bayliss, the coach of both NSW and Kolkata Knight Riders, former England head coach Peter Moores, and Mick Newell, the coach of Nottinghamshire.

Bayliss, who would be the first Australian to coach England, has emerged as the surprise name on the short-list following a worldwide search by a specialist headhunting firm.

Although he lacks playing experience at the top level, he has enjoyed coaching success in both domestic and international cricket and in all formats of the game.

In one-day cricket he led Sri Lanka to the World Cup final in 2011, and coached Kolkata Knight Riders to the IPL title in 2012. At first-class level he won his second Sheffield Shield last week with NSW, where he returned as head coach a year ago.

The 51-year-old, who had a modest playing career, spent four years as Sri Lanka head coach before standing down after the 2011 World Cup to spend more time with his family in Sydney.

Bayliss has more international experience than his competitors but lacks the knowledge of the English game and the county system.

The ECB has invested heavily in its coaching structures, prompting a desire to appoint an Englishman and Moores retains strong high-level support at the board despite the failure of his previous tenure in charge of the team.

One of the key challenges for the ECB will be to integrate the new head coach with the role being sketched out for Flower. He will retain a powerful voice in English cricket and the ECB is reluctant to move away completely from an era that produced success before the winter's capitulation. Moores appointed Flower as his assistant and retains a good relationship with him, while Giles was a key member of his set-up.

The defeat by Holland stunned Giles, only 24 hours after he insisted he was the right man to replace Flower. "I believed I was 24 hours ago, I'm not sure that one performance has changed my mind," he said.

"You have bad days at the office and this is a real bad one. I still believe I can do the job for England, it's for other people to decide if I can or not."

Giles has a contract to be England's limited-overs coach until the 2015 World Cup, but the ECB is now committed to having only one head coach across all formats of the game. Should it decide that it cannot give the wider role to Giles, it will have to pay out the remainder of his contract.

Giles's record this northern winter now reads 10 defeats in 15 matches across all formats. "Today was pretty embarrassing, and complacent. It was a poor performance," he said. "None of us are very happy. With all due respect to the Dutch, we shouldn't be losing to them. We're too good a side. It was ugly in the end and embarrassing. All we can do is apologise to everyone at home.

"You can't just pick and choose when you are up for it. You have to be up for it all the time. The only thing in Holland's minds this morning was beating England and sending us home. We should have been aware of that, every one of us.

"I don't like to discuss what I will say to the team, but we will have a chat before leaving the ground, as we always do. I hope they will know that is not acceptable.

"Every time you put on an England shirt, bowl a ball, field a ball, hit a ball, you have to have everything in it, and we didn't today."

Stuart Broad, who said he did not know whether he would continue as captain of the T20 team, described the performance as shocking, complacent and lacking hunger.

Holland captain Peter Borren said this win was less exhilarating but more satisfying than their victory against England at Lord's in 2009.

"It wasn't really close, was it?" he said. "In 2009 it was a big shock, but I don't think tonight feels like an upset. If you watched all our cricket, then you would have thought we'd beat someone.

"We definitely just ambushed them in 2009. It's hard to recapture that feeling, because there we won off the last ball. Here we won by 45 runs. This, in a way, is more satisfying because it's a build-up of a lot of work."

THE CONTENDERS

Ashley Giles: England limited-overs coach with a contract until the 2015 World Cup, but ECB now wants a head coach across all formats, and he has suffered a lamentable audition.

Trevor Bayliss: Australian, 51, has had coaching success with NSW and Kolkata Knight Riders, and has experience of international cricket after four years as Sri Lanka coach.

Peter Moores: Spell as England head coach ended in a row with Kevin Pietersen. Rebuilt career since by steering Lancashire to county title in 2011.

Mick Newell: One of the leading county coaches, having won the title with Nottinghamshire. Lacks playing experience at the highest level.

The Telegraph, London