Ellyse Perry says only a ??subsection of society?? has a sexist view towards women?s sport.

Ellyse Perry says only a ??subsection of society?? has a sexist view towards women?s sport. Photo: Brendan Esposito

Australian basketball great Lauren Jackson has blasted ''sexist'' coverage of the NFL Super Bowl and dual international Ellyse Perry wants female athletes to be judged on their performance, not their looks.

Former Canberra Capital Jackson was fuming when it was reported Seattle's Super Bowl win on Monday was the city's first major sporting triumph since 1979.

The statistic overlooked Jackson's WNBA titles with the Seattle Storm in 2004 and 2010.

Lauren Jackson is upset at reports claiming the Seattle Seahawks' Super Bowl win was the city's first major sporting triumph. Jackson played for WNBA team the Seattle Storm qwho won championships in 2004 and 2010.

Lauren Jackson is upset at reports claiming the Seattle Seahawks' Super Bowl win was the city's first major sporting triumph. Jackson played for WNBA team the Seattle Storm qwho won championships in 2004 and 2010. Photo: Getty Images

''I am so dirty about this - sexism alive and well in sports and sporting culture,'' Jackson tweeted. ''We were good enough then and we are certainly good enough now to be acknowledged.

''Minimising female achievement in sport, again.''

Perry is rated as Australia's most marketable athlete, has had a song penned about her and has played cricket and soccer for her country.

But cricket fans on the Facebook page ''Cricket memes'' posted sexist comments on a photo of Perry.

The 23-year-old was unaware of the drama, but the posts, which referred to her appearance and ability as a sportswoman, have been removed.

Perry said only a ''subsection of society'' had a sexist view to women's sport, declaring the Australian women's cricket team enjoyed ''phenomenal support'' in its Ashes campaign. Perry was player of the series in the Ashes, scoring 286 runs and claiming 12 wickets.

''It was fantastic in the Ashes and there certainly was a lot of interest in the team; it was a really, really positive thing,'' Perry said.

''Within men's and women's sport there are players who are more recognisable for different reasons.

''But all the crowds we had were just interested in the quality of cricket being played and overall ability of both squads.''

SportsPro, a British magazine, named Perry as Australia's most marketable athlete last year.

A Launceston band, Brandish, has written a musical tribute to Perry as she juggles her soccer and cricket careers.

The song has been a hit on YouTube and has been played on radio station Triple J. It's a rolling declaration of love to Perry, and in one verse she is compared to two male cricket and soccer greats.

''She's probably the most talented person in the world. It's like if Jacques Kallis and Pele were morphed into a girl,'' the song says.

Perry will resume her domestic cricket and soccer campaigns this week. She will play cricket for the NSW Breakers against the ACT Meteors on Wednesday and back up for Sydney FC against Canberra United on Sunday.

''The side products are part and parcel with the sport, but recognition is on performance,'' Perry said. ''It's such a subsection of society saying those things on the internet and you get more of a grasp of people's ideas … But the majority of people who watch sport watch it for the quality.''

Jackson, pictured, was stunned when the Storm's achievements were forgotten after the Seattle Seahawks beat the Denver Broncos on Monday. Jackson is playing basketball in China and will return to Canberra next season.

She was the No.1 WNBA draft pick to the Storm in 2001 and is a four-time Olympian.

''It's [forgetting the Storm's titles] been going on the last week.

''It's not just one news outlet. I don't accept that,'' Jackson tweeted.

''[It is] undermining everything we have achieved in the sport.

''We could start by acknowledging our achievements not ignoring them.''