Workers put finishing touches to the entrance to the complex in Costa do Sauipe where the Brazil 2014 FIFA World Cup final draw will take place on December 6.

Workers put finishing touches to the entrance to the complex in Costa do Sauipe where the Brazil 2014 FIFA World Cup final draw will take place on December 6. Photo: AFP

Football Federation Australia chief executive David Gallop believes the nation should keep dreaming about making the knockout phase of next year's World Cup, even if the team lands in a ''group of death''.

The draw, which is being held just outside Salvador - one of the host cities for next year's event - is scheduled to take place in the early hours of Saturday morning, Melbourne time.

Gallop, who departs for Brazil on Wednesday, wants supporters to embrace whatever draw the Socceroos come up with.

''It's going to be exciting to find out what the challenge looks like,'' he said. ''This is the start of the mission to unite all Australians behind the Socceroos.

''There's not much mileage about talking about groups of death when there's no such [thing as] easy groups. It's the World Cup, and over 200 countries have tried to be part of it, so we expect it to be tough.

''Friday [Brazilian time] will be a moment when even the least-interested people will take a glance at what's ahead. That's an exciting spark for us to use.''

With so many top nations not seeded, there is a possibility that several groups will contain possibly three of the most powerful teams in soccer.

Powerhouses such as the Netherlands, Italy, England, Portugal and France have slipped out of the top eight places.

Gallop believes the Socceroos can defy the widespread predictions of doom. ''No doubt there's now an air of positivity around the camp and that is having a flow-on effect with how our fans are looking at the next six months and beyond,'' he said.

''The fact is, every game is going to be tough, but we want to win them. The aspiration is to make the second round.''

Many are dreaming of facing up to traditional enemy England or home team Brazil.

''There's no doubt that playing England would be enormous,'' Gallop said. ''I also think there's a romance to playing Brazil at football for any country, including ours, particularly when they're hosting a World Cup.''

Socceroos coach Ange Postecoglou is in Brazil to inspect a potential World Cup base in Vitoria, some 500 kilometres north of Rio de Janeiro. The base is primarily desired by the FFA because of its central location in Brazil.

''They're just making sure it's what he's after,'' Gallop said. ''We want to give the players every opportunity by providing the facilities the coaching staff require.''