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Nicky Phillips

Nicky Phillips is Science Editor for The Sydney Morning Herald.

Sci-Tech

Spacecraft Rosetta arrives at Comet 67-P after decade-long journey

Nicky Phillips After more than ten-years travelling 6.4-billion kilometres on a road trip around the solar system, the spacecraft Rosetta has 'arrived' at its destination, a distant comet named...

Australian scientist Abigail Allwood first woman to lead project team for life on Mars

Allwood

Nicky Phillips The first woman and the first Australian to lead a NASA team that will search for life on Mars has criticised the Australian government's decision to slash its science budget, calling the funding...

Sci-Tech

Young scientists use crowd sourcing to fund their research

Scientists tap crowd funding for research: Medical researcher Martin Rees.

Nicky Phillips In heart disease, the same stuff that makes snot green finds its way into the body’s arteries, making their walls sticky and prone to damage.

Telomeres – the invisible elixir of youth

woman

Nicky Phillips Since antiquity, society has obsessed over the visible signs of growing old – wrinkles, grey hair and saggy skin, but there’s a more important condition of ageing, one that’s...

Using physics to perfect elite diving

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Nicky Phillips On the face of it, theoretical physics and elite diving appear to have little in common, but theories from one are being used to improve the other.  

Sci-Tech

Research sector plans to correct low numbers of women in research

Diversity underlies innovation, says Professor Nalini Joshi.

Nicky Phillips and Bridie Smith Australian universities and research institutes have joined forces to devise a national program to correct the severe under-representation of women in senior positions in the scientific workforce.

Sci-Tech

Stress-related ageing: the long and short of it

No beauty secret: Study finds a person's lifestyle choices can offset ageing.

Nicky Phillips The secret to anti-ageing does not come in an expensive bottle of face cream but with regular sleep, exercise and a balanced diet.

Dr who? Campaign to boost digital profile of Australia's female scientists

Wikipedia

Bridie Smith and Nicky Phillips Ever heard of Dora Lush? She was an Australian microbiologist working in the 1940s on developing a vaccine for a deadly disease known as scrub typhus.

Doctor who? Campaign to boost online profile of Australia's female scientists

?Scientist Emma Johnston. Credit:UNSW

JohnstonSIMS.jpg

Nicky Phillips, Bridie Smith Ever heard of Dora Lush? She was an Australian microbiologist working in the 1940s on developing a vaccine for a deadly disease known as scrub typhus.

Spacecraft Rosetta's comet landing just got twice as difficult

An artist's impression of the Kepler 62 system, which consists of five worlds circling a yellowish star slightly smaller and dimmer than our sun in an undated handout photo. Astronomers reported Monday, Nov. 4, 2013, that there could be as many as 40 billion habitable Earth-size planets in the galaxy, based on a new analysis of data from NASA's Kepler spacecraft. (Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics via The New York Times) -- NO SALES; FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY WITH STORY SLUGGED SCI EARTH PLANETS. ALL OTHER USE PROHIBITED.

Nicky Phillips Landing on a comet was never going to be easy. But the European Space Agency’s attempt to land the first spacecraft on a distant ball of ice just got more complicated.

Sci-Tech

Fierce but furry: feathers were a common dinosaur trait

Kulindadromeus zabaikalicus.

Nicky Phillips Feathers were a more common feature among dinosaurs than previously thought.

Sci-Tech

Parental training may offset health problems linked to social disadvantage, study shows

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Nicky Phillips John Lennon may have grown up in a poor, broken family but he knew love is all you need. 

Sci-Tech

Be nice to your germs, they keep you alive

bacteria

Nicky Phillips Of the number of cells that make up your body only about 10 per cent are human, the building blocks of organs like the brain, skin and heart. 

Sci-Tech

Superfoods or superfrauds? Scientists are unimpressed

Kale

Nicky Phillips New superfoods seem to be discovered with increasing frequency, but there's no magic berry, writes Nicky Phillips.

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Why taller, long-limbed players dominate modern tennis

Kyrgios irked by mum's doubt (Thumbnail)

Nicky Phillips There’s little doubt that Nick Kyrgios’s spectacular win over tennis great Rafael Nadal was the result of years of practice and perseverance and a good dose of raw talent.

Sci-Tech

NASA mission to map carbon dioxide from space

PHOTO CREDIT:   NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Nicky Phillips NASA is set to launch its Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 into space, which will take precise measurements of carbon dioxide, data that scientists will then use to map the sources and sinks of the...

Language likely started with hand signals

Speaking volumes: Experiments conducted by West Australian scientists showed a gesture system was the best communication system in the absence of language.

Nicky Phillips The origin of human language has been described as one of science’s oldest and most controversial puzzles, but new evidence gathered by Western Australian scientists provides hefty support for...

Fruit, veggies delay onset of multiple chronic diseases, study reveals

Study examines the benefits of a healthy diet: Fruit and vegetable consumption linked to delays in chronic illness.

Nicky Phillips An apple a day may keep you-know-who away, but a healthy intake of fruit will also keep your first chronic disease away too.

Sci-Tech

Orang-utans binge eat sweet foods like humans

Primate pig outs: Research shows Orangutans have evolved sophisticated mechanisms to store suprlus energy as fat.

Nicky Phillips Humans aren’t the only primates who binge on sweet food. In the presence of an abundant supply of fruit orang-utans will stuff themselves with wild berries and figs.

Peering into a person's genome opens a Pandora's box

Illustration: Michael Mucci.

Nicky Phillips Schwartz and his family’s experience highlights a growing issue in the relatively new field of genomics.