Technology

Google unveils new troll-fighting tool

Google's new API, which can show whether 'the internet' thinks a comment is toxic, is still a work in progress.

The company has publicly released an artificial intelligence tool, called Perspective, that scans online content and rates how "toxic" it is based on ratings by thousands of people.

3D camera tipped for new iPhone

This render shows the same hypothetical phone in various colours.

Apple may be considering a camera designed for authentication and augmented reality for its next high-end iPhone, according to reports.

Uber sexism charges a wake-up call

Instances of sexism and harassment of women in Silicon Valley do not appear to be isolated incidents.

Explosive charges at Uber are shining a bright light on what has for years been an unsettling reality in Silicon Valley: Women routinely confront sexism and harassment on the job.

Why Apple TV has repeatedly failed

The most recent Apple TV, released in 2015.

Time and again Apple has set out to revolutionise the living room, but ultimately it's settled for turning the television set into a giant iPhone.

Optus switches on 4.5G mobile network

Optus' new network will provide faster internet connection speeds to compatible handsets, which will release this year.

Macquarie Park in Sydney is the first suburb getting access to Optus' new 4.5G network, which is capable of 1.03Gbps maximum theoretical download speeds.

Snap looks beyond app to hardware

Snap has been on a hiring spree.

Snap is putting itself into competition with 'all the guys you don't want to be fighting against in the world': Facebook, Google and Apple.

Halo Wars 2: Spartans meet StarCraft, again

Atriox and his Banished are a much more interesting alien force than the traditional Covenant.

Like its predecessor, Halo Wars 2 combines the lore, character and artistry of the main Halo series with the methodical gameplay of a real-time strategy game like Starcraft or Warcraft III. Unlike its predecessor, Halo Wars 2 feels like the best of both worlds.

Microsoft calls for 'digital Geneva Convention'

Microsoft president Brad Smith is urging tech companies to chase neutrality in cyber wars.

In a policy speech that puts Microsoft front-and-centre in the shifting ground of both politics and nationalism, company president Brad Smith said tech companies must declare themselves neutral when nations go up against nations in cyberspace.