Alexandra Williams at the Magistrates Court with her lawyer, left, and husband.

Alexandra Williams at the Magistrates Court with her lawyer, left, and husband. Photo: Eddie Jim

A passenger who touched the buttocks of a crew member and tried to kiss him on the cheek on a flight from Manila to Melbourne has been ordered by a magistrate to behave for the next three months.

Magistrate Tim Walsh accepted that Alexandra Rose Williams, 36, had behaved "completely out of character" on the Philippine Airlines flight on July 19 last year.

Mr Walsh heard that Ms Williams had been offered drinks after take-off that included a "bit of vodka" which she drank while taking medication.

Before the hearing started, Mr Walsh admonished Williams for earlier "dancing" out of court when the case was stood down. She told him she had "tiptoed".

Prosecutor Megan Hood told Melbourne Magistrates Court that about an hour into the flight Williams approached crew member Romme Luna who agreed to her request to visit a friend in first class.

Ms Hood said when he saw Williams later sitting in the cabin crew seats she ignored his request to return to her seat. Later she did to get her mobile phone.

Williams then returned to the galley, where Mr Luna and colleague Anna Clarino were situated, and began playing music from her phone and started dancing and singing while "getting close" to him, she said.

Ms Hood said Williams touched Mr Luna on the buttocks and tried to kiss him before he asked her several times to return to her seat, which she ignored, before he read her "notification and security card" to her.

After being told she would be reported, Mr Luna approached her husband Stephen Pryde for assistance during which Williams several times told Ms Clarino in a loud voice that "nobody tells (her) what to do".

Ms Hood said Mr Pryde tried to persuade his wife to return to her seat, but in a raised voice told him to "f--- off".

Defence lawyer Alex Lewneberg said Williams had an extroverted personality and was a "very friendly" person whose uncharacteristic behaviour was the result of mixing alcohol with medication.

Mr Lewenberg, who tendered a number of character references, urged Mr Walsh to put his client on a non-conviction bond to be of good behaviour.

Ms Hood asked that if he agreed to that course, the investigating officer had requested that Williams write letters of apology to both members of the flight crew.

Mr Walsh told Williams, who pleaded guilty to offensive and disorderly behaviour, he accepted after reading the references that her behaviour was "completely out of character".

Without wishing to lessen the offence, Mr Walsh said he had seen "a lot worse things on a plane", and also reminded Williams that those subjected to her conduct have "got jobs to do".

He released her on a $500 order to be of good behaviour for three months, pay $232 costs and write the letters of apology.