An Austrian village with a particularly rude name has become a tourist attraction. It is included on Gary Gale's 'Vaguely Rude Place Names of the World' map.

An Austrian village with a particularly rude name has become a tourist attraction. It is included on Gary Gale's 'Vaguely Rude Place Names of the World' map. Photo: AFP

Most of us have heard of Titicaca, the high-altitude lake that straddles Peru and Bolivia, and the prominent Breton port of Brest.

But how many people knew about the Philippine town of Anus, the Cambridgeshire hamlet called Six Mile Bottom, or the Indonesian settlement of Semen?

Now, thanks to the meticulous research of Londoner Gary Gale – a "geo-technologist and self professed geek with a life" – all the world's most amusingly puerile place names can be found on one giggle-inducing website.

One of the Australian highlights is Victoria's Spanker Knob.

One of the Australian highlights is Victoria's Spanker Knob.

Mr Gale's creation – "Vaguely Rude Place Names of the World" – contains hundreds of ludicrously immature road, town and village names, all plotted on an eye-catching map.

Victoria is the star performer in Australia, with the state featuring such pearlers as Tittybong, Bumbang and Spanker Knob.

Britain's funniest include Pratt's Bottom in Orpington, Andrews Knob in Cheshire, Wetwang in Yorkshire and Ringrash Road in Northern Ireland.

Over in the US, there's Hooker in Oklahoma, Climax in Colorado, and Mianus in Connecticut – which featured in one particularly adolescent sketch in Jackass: the Movie.

And then there's the Albanian village of Crap, the Algerian settlement of Tit, and countless more examples too rude to repeat.

"I've had a lifelong love affair with maps since discovering the Harry Beck map of the London Underground on the back of the London A-Z street atlas at an early age," says Mr Gale, on his website. His love affair with infantile comedy is self evident, and is bound to help thousands of like-minded souls stave off boredom during their working day.

- The Telegraph, London