Flowers at the Swanston Street site where Alexander and Bridget Jones were killed when a brick wall collapsed on them.

Flowers at the Swanston Street site where Alexander and Bridget Jones were killed when a brick wall collapsed on them. Photo: Mal Fairclough

Three Grocon employees are continuing to refuse to give police investigators statements about the fatal collapse of a wall on the construction company's CUB Brewery site in Swanston Street.

Three young pedestrians were killed in March when the wall down amid high winds.

Lawyers for the three told a Coroners Court hearing into the deaths on Thursday morning that they would not yet give statements on the CUB site, because by doing so they could incriminate themselves.

The wall collapse killed Bridget Jones, her brother Alexander and academic Dr Marie-Faith Fiawoo.

After the Coroners Court earlier this month moved to direct a reluctant Grocon to give evidence over the wall's collapse – more than nine months after the accident – 14 employees have given statements to police.

But the three remaining employees will agree to do so only after other processes in the investigation into the tragedy have occurred, their lawyers told State Coroner Ian Gray.

In a hearing on Thursday morning packed with lawyers – more than 20 were there representing Grocon, WorkSafe, Melbourne City Council and others – Judge Gray was told the three Grocon employees had thus far refused to give evidence to police.

Judge Gray asked lawyers appearing for the three whether they were refusing to give evidence at this point because "each considers there may be a matter of incrimination involved."

Lawyers for the three agreed this was the case.

Judge Gray suppressed the names of the three Grocon employees, as well as the name of a fourth, although that staff member has agreed to voluntarily give police a statement about the wall's collapse.

WorkSafe, which is also investigating the fatal collapse, agreed to hand over the evidence it has compiled only if Judge Gray ordered it to – which he duly did.

It is understood WorkSafe is concerned about parties, including Grocon, seeing its evidence ahead of the safety regulator's decision on whether or not to prosecute anyone over the deaths.

A two-week inquest into the deaths has been scheduled for next June.