Paul Byrnes | Canberra Times
Advertisement
Paul Byrnes

Paul Byrnes was director of the Sydney Film Festival from 1989 to 1998. He has been a film critic for The Sydney Morning Herald for 20 years. In 2007, he was awarded the Geraldine Pascall prize for critical writing, the highest award in the Australian media for critics in any genre.

Brothers' Nest review: Jacobson brothers have blood on their hands in dark comedy

Brothers' Nest review: Jacobson brothers have blood on their hands in dark comedy

It's an Aussie version of a comedy of violence – somewhere between Blood Simple and Fargo – but it's more Leyland brothers than Coen brothers.

  • by Paul Byrnes

Latest

Upgrade review: Humanity the missing link as horror king looks to the future

Upgrade review: Humanity the missing link as horror king looks to the future

This clever, low-budget Aussie movie by horror-meister Leigh Whannell taps into our oldest fears – such as the thing that lives under your bed – and creates a new one.

  • by Paul Byrnes
Gringo review: Drug caper goes south as Nash Edgerton loses control

Gringo review: Drug caper goes south as Nash Edgerton loses control

A comedy thriller made by Australians, written by Americans, funded by Amazon Studios, and set largely in Mexico, Gringo is neither funny nor thrilling.

  • by Paul Byrnes
LBJ Review: Laying bare the naked politics of JFK's successor

LBJ Review: Laying bare the naked politics of JFK's successor

Woody Harrelson plays Lyndon Johnson in this 'slightly eccentric' film that begins in the years before JFK's assassination, writes Paul Brynes.

  • by Paul Byrnes
BPM: love and protest in the time of AIDS

BPM: love and protest in the time of AIDS

BPM is a beautiful film, full of drama and humour, love and politics, argument and action.

  • by Paul Byrnes
Aurore review: Agnes Jaoui in role of her life in achingly real film

Aurore review: Agnes Jaoui in role of her life in achingly real film

The film offers blazing proof that stories about life, at any age, can be smart, funny, engaging and revealing, if they go deep and remain fresh.

  • by Paul Byrnes
Advertisement
Life of the Party review: funny moments and an earnest message

Life of the Party review: funny moments and an earnest message

Parts of the film are like a female Animal House, but the heart of the film is about McCarthy the den mother empowering her brood of beautiful but vulnerable younger sisters.

  • by Paul Byrnes
Simon Baker can breathe easy now after impressive debut as film director

Simon Baker can breathe easy now after impressive debut as film director

If he never makes another movie, Simon Baker can be proud of Breath. Most of the credit goes to Tim Winton's book, of course, but Baker has managed not to botch its adaptation to the screen – an achievement for an actor on debut as director.

  • by Paul Byrnes
On Body and Soul: Startling and original love story a dream come true

On Body and Soul: Startling and original love story a dream come true

It seems not to obey any of the rules of cinema – especially in pacing, which is uniformly stately throughout – but you have to know all the rules to be able to bend and break them so well.

  • by Paul Byrnes
The Avengers: Infinity War has plenty of surprises but emotional depth of a puddle

The Avengers: Infinity War has plenty of surprises but emotional depth of a puddle

Marvel betrays the richness of its comic books in pursuit of the bedazzlement of the modern blockbuster movie; leaving us undernourished but entertained.

  • by Paul Byrnes
Super Troopers 2 review: Cult hit cops a surprisingly predictable sequel

Super Troopers 2 review: Cult hit cops a surprisingly predictable sequel

While the first movie was proudly disreputable - five highway cops in rural Vermont are so bored they dream up pranks to play on each other and the motorists they victimise - the second is, surprisingly, more anodyne.

  • by Paul Byrnes