Capital Life: Happenings in the Canberra arts scene, November 17 2018
Advertisement

Capital Life: Happenings in the Canberra arts scene, November 17 2018

Taglietti People

As part of DESIGN Canberra’s celebration of the work of Enrico Taglietti, PhotoAccess in partnership with DESIGN Canberra has commissioned Canberra photographer Mark Mohell to create a series of intimate portraits of people with strong connections to Taglietti and his design work.

 Mark Mohell, Enrico, 2018, archival pigment print, detail

 Mark Mohell, Enrico, 2018, archival pigment print, detailCredit:Mark Mohell

Taglietti People features seven black-and-white portraits, including the architect himself Enrico Taglietti, together with well known Canberra glass artist Judi Elliot and her husband Bob Elliott, who live in and own a home design by Taglietti; builder Bob Beaver, who built Giralang Primary school along with many of Enrico's other designs; as well as Canberran's Suzie Northcote, Mervyn Paterson, Gillian (Dinny) Killen and architect and Supermanoeuvre director Dave Pigrams.

Dr Sarah Engledow writes in the exhibition essay, “The Taglietti people photographed by Mark Mohell express some of the traits of Canberrans that make life in the city interesting. Across generations, the geophysicist, the public servant, the artist, the builder, the developer and the architects share characteristics of unobtrusiveness, intelligence, curiosity and creativity.”

Advertisement

At EAST Hotel, Kingston, until November 25.

Qwire, at the Fair Day, are preparing for the final concert of 2018.

Qwire, at the Fair Day, are preparing for the final concert of 2018.

Taking flight

Going from strength to strength, Canberra Gay and Lesbian Qwire heads to The Q for the final concert of their 25th anniversary year.

Qwire blew the audience away with a preview at the SpringOUT Festival’s Fair Day recently and is squaring up for two stunning performances next weekend.

Taking Flight celebrates the strength of the queer community. Taking inspiration from the likes of Concita Wurst, Maya Angelou, Sia and even Disney, Qwire’s 25th anniversary concert reminds people of all genders, orientations and expressions that they can look forward with pride to the future they dream of.

Qwire is proud to be providing Auslan interpretation at the concert on Saturday, November 17. AT Loop is also available. Bookings for those who wish to take full advantage of this service should be made with Qwire convenor Dave Worner via convenor@canberraqwire.org.au.

Once again, Northside Community Service is providing transport assistance for those who might otherwise be unable to get to the concert. Bookings can be made on 0456 435 203.

November 17, 7pm, and November 18, 4pm, at The Q, Crawford Street, Queanbeyan.

Birthday celebrations

Messengers is an arts-based early support program that has been improving the mental health of young Canberrans for 18 years.

To mark the occasion, the Tuggeranong Arts Centre will be presenting a collection of student work in the Always Hope exhibition.

In their work, young artists have been exploring and responding to the energy, entropy, harmony and chaos of life.

Arts Centre’s executive officer Rauny Worm said the life-affirming program, first funded through a suicide prevention initiative, has provided young people with creative respite from the pressures of navigating adolescence.

“The young people that come to the program are given the task to explore their challenges through drama, writing, music and visual arts. The work they create sends out their own personal message, and with the experience of having personal control of their situation, their resilience grows,” Worm says.

Until November 24, Tuggeranong Arts Centre, Reed Street, Greenway.

State of emergency, 2018, Michele England, screen printed reclaimed fabrics, brass safetypins, bandage, hospital blanket, 62 x 54cm, detail

State of emergency, 2018, Michele England, screen printed reclaimed fabrics, brass safetypins, bandage, hospital blanket, 62 x 54cm, detail

Fragmented fabric

How does a quilt relate to endangered Australian flora and fauna? Local artist Michele England has drawn parallels between the comfort afforded by a quilt and the fragmented habitat faced by many Australian species in her latest solo exhibition Remnants.

England utilises the techniques of screen printing, machine sewing and embroidery to make her works.

Quilts, by nature, are many small pieces bound together to make a larger single piece. Quilts provide warmth, are made with love and often use favourite fabrics, imbuing them with memories. England’s new work utilises these quintessential quilt elements to discuss habitat fragmentation across our contemporary landscape.

Canberra Contemporary ArtSpace, Manuka Gallery, Furneaux St, until November 25.

Karen Hardy is a reporter at The Canberra Times.

Most Viewed in National

Loading
Advertisement