Sixty nine Fluffy homes are still standing. Now we'll know which ones
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Sixty nine Fluffy homes are still standing. Now we'll know which ones

The ACT government will publish a list of Canberra's remaining Mr Fluffy homes in December, distinguishing publicly for the first time between the houses still standing and those that have been demolished.

Asbestos Response Taskforce executive director Bruce Fitzgerald told Mr Fluffy homeowners not participating in the government's buyback and demolition scheme of the move in a letter sent on Wednesday.

In the letter, Mr Fitzgerald said 954 of the 1023 Canberra homes affected by the potentially deadly asbestos had been demolished and removed from the affected residential premises register.

While the government published a public list of Mr Fluffy homes in 2015, the Asbestos Response Taskforce has maintained the affected residential premises register behind closed doors, leaving the public unaware of whether the homes listed publicly have been demolished or if they remain standing.

The government will publish the affected residential premises register on the Asbestos Response Taskforce website on December 6 and regularly update it as more homes are razed.

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The original list of 1023 homes will remain publicly available.

"While demolition activity is slowing, it is important that the community and in particular tradespeople, remain aware of the presence and potential danger of loose-fill asbestos insulation," Mr Fitzgerald's letter to homeowners says.

Lorraine Carvalho, who owns one of the remaining Mr Fluffy homes, was not impressed by the letter.

"I see this as just another bit of intimidation to get us to sign over the property," she said.

Mrs Carvalho and her husband Leo refused to participate in the buyback and demolition scheme because they believe the government's offer for their property is unfair, and because three separate inspections have cleared living areas in her Lyons home of contamination.

Lorraine Carvalho and her husband Leo refused to participate in the buyback and demolition scheme

Lorraine Carvalho and her husband Leo refused to participate in the buyback and demolition schemeCredit:Elesa Kurtz

Mr Fitzgerald's letter was sent after the Sunday Canberra Times revealed the ACT government still has no policy in place to determine how it will deal with homeowners who have not participated in the voluntary buyback and demolition scheme, which the government hopes to wrap up by 2020.

"The ACT government’s position remains that properties affected by loose-fill asbestos insulation should be vacated as soon as possible, and that the only way to remove the physical, financial and social risks is through demolition," an ACT government spokesman said last month.

"The taskforce continues to work with homeowners and individuals affected by loose-fill asbestos insulation and will work to determine the best course of action between now and 2020."

Blake Foden is a reporter at the Sunday Canberra Times. He has worked as a journalist in Australia, New Zealand and the UK.